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Article #7 (17 is last):
Newsgroups: freenet.sci.comp.atari.log
From: xx004@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Atari SIG)
Subject: Jul.21,1990 Atari SIG Mini-Expo & C.O.W.
Date: Sat Jul 21 00:36:35 1990



On Saturday, July 21st, 1990, the Atari SIGOps announced:


        The Cleveland Free-Net Atari SIGOps are pleased to announce
the first Atari SIG Mini-Expo.  YOU are needed to make it a success.
Information on the event has been published in Z*Net Online Magazine
as well as information on the Children of War Campaign.

        If you would like to help out, bring your system, and/or just
would like more information then please respond to this posting.


 
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                     /   //    //    //// //  // /     //
                       //   //////  // ////  ////     //
                     //  /   //    //  ///  // /     //    
                   //  //         //   //  //   /   //   
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                       Z*Net Atari Online Magazine
                       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
               July 20, 1990   Volume 5  No. 29  Issue: 529
 #######################################################################
 (c=) 1990 by Rovac Industries,  PO Box 59,  Middlesex, New Jersey 08846
 #######################################################################
  BBS 201-968-8148 * CIS 71777,2140 * Cleveland Free-Net * GEnie Z-NET
 #######################################################################
 Staff: Ron Kovacs, John Nagy, Alice Amore, Jon Clarke, Bruce Hansford,
 Robert Ford, Mark Quinn, John King Tarpinian, Bruce Kennedy, Eric Gove,
 Terry Schreiber and Michael Shutz - German Newswire Editor
 #######################################################################
 

            **************      A T A R I     ***************
            **************        MINI        ***************
            **************     EXPOSITION     ***************
 

          Atari Mini-expo at The Slavic Village Harvest Festival
         Sponsored by:  The Cleveland Free-Net Atari SIG & friends
 
 The first and largest Cleveland public Atari computer and Lynx
 demonstration will be held at the 13th Annual Slavic Village Harvest
 Festival sponsored by the Cleveland Free-Net Atari SIG and local
 bulletin boards.
 
 The Festival is located on the near East side of Cleveland and is easily
 accessible through the I-77 freeway.  Instead of expensive outdoor
 booths to demonstrate Atari products, the Atari SIG has reserved a store
 in the center of the Festival at 5900 Fleet Avenue.  About 100,000
 people are expected to attend the festival leaving at least a few
 hundred to attend the Atari SIG's demonstration.
 
 The demonstration of Atari computers, Lynx and products will be held at
 the exact time of the festival.  On Saturday, August 18th, the Festival
 will be from 4PM to Midnight.  On Sunday, August 19th, the Festival will
 be from Noon to 9PM.
 
               What will be going on at this demonstration?
 
 The main event will be the display of Atari 8-bit, ST computers and
 Portfolio by users to the public.  The main idea behind this
 demonstration is that we can let people know that Atari is still in
 business, they make some pretty nice computers, and that Atari isn't
 just a game company.  We are taking the main ideas behind what the
 Revolution was all about and we are going through with them.  It is
 word-of-mouth advertising at its prime.
 
 The second event will be the demonstration of Lynx video game systems.
 Yes, we know that the Lynx isn't a computer system but it is an Atari
 product and if it succeeds in the U.S. then there is more money for
 Atari to spend on pushing its computers.  At the store, we plan on
 inviting any Lynx owner that wants to play multi-player games.  They
 will not only be having fun but they will also be convincing people to
 become Atari Lynx owners.
 
 The last event will be the collection of donated 8-bit computers to the
 Children of War campaign.  The Children of War campaign has been started
 by a woman by the name of Joyce Brabner.  (Editor Note: An article
 written by Joyce is included in this issue).  Her hope is to have 8-bit
 computer systems donated that are no longer being used to victims of
 crisis.
 
 These people would then access a special computer network by the name of
 Peace*Net in order to talk to family and friends across the world that
 have been separated and cannot afford to talk or write to each other in
 any other way.  More information is available on the Cleveland Free-Net
 Atari SIG and an article will also be published in the next Atari SIG's
 Newsletter so watch for it.

 Who is invited to this demonstration?  Everyone.  However, if you want
 to Lynx up your games, bring your computer to demo software or products,
 or become a vendor at this event, please write us before doing so and
 tell us all the necessary information such as what you plan on bringing
 and at what time you plan on appearing.  Vendors should be aware that we
 are limited in space since the store is only as big as a Radio Shack so
 contact us as soon as you can.  Also remember that your main customers
 (even though there will be a lot of Atari users attending) will be the
 public who does not know much about Atari so you may want to bring
 products that can be sold and used right away - possibly Atari computers
 or Lynx systems.
 
 Of course this will not be a major Atari expo such as World of Atari
 shows but if you are in the neighborhood and are interested in showing
 off what your computer can do then you are welcome.  Remember, the
 special thing about this demonstration is that we aren't inviting people
 to motels or gymnasiums to see Atari computers, we have taken the
 initiative and have actually gone to where the public is to demonstrate
 these systems and products.

                            The public awaits!

 The festival will be between E.65th and 55th Streets.  You wil be able
 to come off of the I-77 freeway to the exit of Fleet Avenue.  You may
 park anywhere you can find room.  People wishing to demonstrate their
 computer are encouraged to come early to drop their equipment off before
 the street is closed to traffic.

                Write to: The Cleveland Free-Net Atari SIG
                              P.O. Box 21815
                          Cleveland, Ohio 44121

                Writing through Internet from Compuserve:
                  >INTERNET: xx004@cleveland.freenet.edu

                         Writing through Bitnet:
                    xx004%cleveland.freenet.edu@cunyvm



 
            **************    HARDWARE FOR    ***************
            **************   CHILDREN OF WAR  ***************
            **************                    ***************
                                              by Joyce Brabner
                                                 Cleveland FreeNet
 
 
 I guess it's time for me to introduce myself.  I'm the person working
 with Len, Mark and other Atari SIG members, to put together basic Atari
 systems, to be donated to young people from Children of War.  The
 project is pretty much as Mark and Len have described it.
 
 A few months ago 47 young people from countries like South Africa,
 Israel, Palestine, Cambodia, El Salvador, Northern Ireland and the U.S.
 got together to tour several American cities, and talk about what it's
 like to live in a war zone.  This year's tour also included
 environmental disaster areas -- 3 Russian teenagers from Chernobyl, and
 kids caught up the cycle of gang violence, from places like East L.A.
 and South Boston.
 
 (Why? Anywhere kids are being shot in the streets is considered a war
 zone.)
 
 What happened?  Children of War chapters started in every city they
 visited.  Teenagers who have seen family or friends killed, who have
 themselves survived torture, or been imprisoned, who have had to flee
 their countries and start over as refugees, got the chance to ask other
 young people in the U.S. for help waging peace.  They also formed very
 close friendships with each other, during the tour.
 
 These friendships are important.  Someone from El Salvador, who has lost
 family to the death squads knows what it's like for a Cambodian teenager
 to live with memories of "the killing fields".  A teenager whose family
 fled Iran, now starting over in San Francisco, understands a Palestinian
 student's hurt, when classmates make fun of the "terrorist!".  An inner
 city gang member got his head put on straight, after hanging out with
 two South African teenagers.
 
 What's my part in all this?  I'm a comic book editor and writer (Eclipse
 Comics).  I'm writing a comic book about the 1990 tour, which will be
 published at the end of this year.  I write my comics on an Atari 8 bit,
 which I learned to use in three days -- no prior experience.  I knew
 about Peace*Net-- an international, non-profit computer BBS.
 
 I also knew that Free Net works.  When I needed help, Len and Mark
 taught me the difference between ascii and binary files, and walked me
 through Omnicom.  I figured I could donate some money for costs, and I
 asked Len and Mark.  They're coming through, with help from you.

 Philip Chow's hardware helped me connect an 18 year old from a country
 7 time zones away, with a 16 year old from Louisville, Kentucky.  It's
 not safe for him to send or receive letters about politics.  Peace*Net
 gets him through.  Next week, I'll connect a Cambodian teenager, now
 living in Los Angeles with her 16 year old friend from Tel Aviv.  Then
 Brooklyn with San Francisco -- it's working!

 Am I writing the Cleveland Atari SIG into the comic book?  You bet.  Do
 we still need hardware?  Absolutely.  Can I write a lot of checks?  Not
 really.  I'm trying to spend money on user accounts and line time.  Most
 of these young people have no money.  I'll happily send donors an
 autographed comic, or a similar thank you.  I can connect you with
 Peace*Net, and answer other questions about Children of War, if you send
 me E-mail.

 Finally, it looks like most of the donors are close in age to the Tour
 participants (12 years to early 20s).  I think that's because you know
 what it's like to really, really need to talk to a good friend who
 understands better than anyone else what's going on -- family stress,
 school worries, uncertainties about the future.  This idea didn't need a
 lot of explanation at all to take off and yes!  Your donations of very
 unglamorous, and thoroughly reliable Ataris ARE making a difference
 that's felt half-way around the world.  Thanks.  I'll keep you posted.

Joyce Brabner ah881
 

Thanks.

Your Atari SIGOps


-- 




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