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Article #144 (214 is last):
From: xx004@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Atari SIG)
Newsgroups: freenet.sci.comp.atari.product.8bit.zmag
Subject: Z*Magazine: 23-Jan-89 #141
Reply-To: xx004@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Atari SIG)
Date: Sat Sep 18 17:02:14 1993



=========================================================================
    SYNDICATE ZMAGAZINE          ISSUE #141          January 23, 1988
=========================================================================
             Copyright (C) Syndicate Publishing Company, 1989
                            Post Office Box 74
                         Middlesex, NJ 08846-0074

                       Publisher/Editor: Ron Kovacs
      CompuServe: 71777,2140     GEnie: ZMAGAZINE    Source: BDG793
=========================================================================
THIS WEEK:

         <*>  Editors Desk............................Ron Kovacs
         <*>  GOE/TCS Update from.................David Sullivan
         <*>  CodeBuster Help.....................Ctsy SIG*Atari
         <*>  800 Owners Column................Howard Siebenrock
         <*>  Analog March Contents.............................
         <*>  ARC Speed Test IBM vs 130XE.......................
         <*>  IBM Monitor with the XEP...............Bob Woolley
         <*>  GEnie ATARI8 RT Top 100 Downloads.......Ctsy GEnie


##############################
<*> EDITORS DESK
##############################
by Ron Kovacs

This weeks update includes the press release from TCS/GOE, (reproduced in 
this weeks Zmag), things look closer to reality there!  DOSXE has been 
released and is available direct from Atari.  The prices I have been told 
range between $10.00 to $15.00.  Write to Atari Corp for more details.  
Keith Ledbetter has removed his Express Telecom files from CompuServe.  
Rumor has it he is working on a cartridge based program similiar to the ST 
telecom file "Interlink".  We will update this story when we can.  Alan 
Reeves has released a few peripheral handlers for Diamond.  Recent uploads 
to the GENIE ATARI8 RT include an ST-Mouse, Touch-Tablet handler.  Check 
out GEnie for these files.

Anything else happening you ask??  Well, other than a few more PD files 
being released, things are slow.  One question we would like answered is 
where are all those cartridges promised?  I would assume that Atari is 
working on it's promises.  For more ST related news and features, read 
STZMAG available on the services.

Recent bulletins on CompuServe in the Atari8 and ST areas talk about 
requests from ANALOG and ST-LOG.  They are looking for your requests for 
their respective magazines.  Do you have a comment to pass along?  Let 
them know! On CompuServe type: GO ATARIVEN and respond!

Z-NET details coming soon!


##############################
<*>  GOE/TCS UPDATE
##############################
Total Control Systems, David R. Sullivan

You probably first heard of GOE back in August/September of 1988, at that
time GOE was shown at the 1988 AtariFest in Glendale, CA. A DEMO Disk
followed in October on GEnie and in user groups. Now, January 1989, GOE is
about to be released.  GOE has been tested over the last 3 to 4 weeks to
insure that it is a bug-free and usable product, it is my hope that GOE
will become the new standard OS for the Atari 8 bit computers.

STATUS OF GOE:

A) We are currently running behind our released schedule, this is DUE to
   dificulty and time needed to completely develop a cartridge based
   product that provides a new and exciting operating environment while at
   the same time maintaining 100% compatability with ALL existing
   software.  Added to the level of programming required, GOE was
   originally being developed in a situation that required over 15 minutes
   to test a single change in GOE -- that has been corrected (curtesy of
   Atari, CORP. and ICD's extensive help).

B) GOE is in it's final debugging stages, and provided that it receives a
   clean bill of health GOE will be shipped the first week of February.

C) Several beta testers have been using GOE for 2 weeks now, all press
   and other qualified people will receive beta cartridges 1 week ahead of
   shipping.

D) The Turbo 816 and GOE, GOE will be tested with the Turbo 816 before it
   is shipped to insure compatability.  A Turbo 816 version is planned,
   this will be a full 16 bit version of GOE.  I am communicating with
   DataQue in an attempt to make GOE the standard for the Turbo 816, the
   advantage of the Turbo 816 is tremendous and gives you a true 16bit
   computer at a great price!

E) I am communicating with Atari, CORP. keeping an open ear to their
   ideas.  With Atari selling thousands of 800xl, 130xe and XEGS computers
   the Atari 8bit future looks bright.  Not to mention the support Atari,
   CORP. is giving in the entertainment area.

F) Advance order's, if you have placed an advance order, it will be filled
   with top priority.  As a BONUS, all people ordering in advance will
   receive a free BONUS Disk containing some exciting new software.

G) Price: The retail price of GOE is $79.95, all discounts for advance
   orders are now void.  User Group discounts are available.

H) If you have requested information, you will receive a mailer the first
   week of February notifying you that GOE is shipping and providing more
   information about GOE.

I) Dealers, dealers packets are now ready and will be sent out within the
   next two weeks.  Thank you for your support, the Atari 8bit users need
   you.

I realize many of you have been waiting for GOE since late October, and I
know it is hard to wait for an exciting new piece of Atari 8bit software;
but I do not want GOE to be a product that is simply a toy.  If GOE and
the Atari 8bit are going to have a successful future together then GOE
MUST BE A PROGRAM THAT YOU WILL USE. GOE will not be shipped until it is
complete and fulfills your needs. Allowing press to be released about GOE
as early as May, 1988 was not under my control nor my intent. The official
press released in September/October 1988 was a little early but has been
useful and has shown the public what GOE is via the DEMO released on
GEnie.  Once the information was about, I had to make the best of it and
did not count on some of the misleading information I have been delt, or
some of the legal problems that I would encounter.

Stay tuned to the GEnie network for more information, GEnie is my link to
you so let your thoughts be known.

goPaint and goWrite DEMO versions will be released shortly after GOE
starts shipping, but have been put on hold until then. Upon shipment,
Total Control Systems will start supporting you with easy and clear
example programs, useful public domain programs and powerful commercial
programs.  A download area here on GEnie will be your source for GOE
public domain software.  A new private area will be setup for GOE users
and GOE developers where you can ask your questions.  The current public
area, CATegory 5, TOPic 24 will be used to convey public information and
answer questions to the general public.

Total Control Systems is working hard to make your Atari 8bit future a
bright one,  and we look forward to your support of our quality products.

GEnie ID: D.SULLIVAN4 (David R. Sullivan)
GOE Area: Atari8, CAT 5, TOP 24

For information about access on OTHER services; information about GOE; or
information about other TCS products please contact us at:

                      Total Control Systems
                        4156 Tolowa Street
                       San Diego, CA 92117
                          (619)270-0111

Total Control Systems also supports Atari 8bit and Atari ST and Amiga
users with:

ST
TC BBSst, a complete ST BBS written in GFA BASIC.  AMIGA includes source
code.  Comming soon on Amiga.   $40

GFA BASIC Programmers Toolkit.  Includes two arcade AMIGA game examples,
source code to the popular Autoplay $15  (PlayIt) digitized sound player
and much more...   Coming soon on Amiga.

8BIT
Action! Programmers Toolkit, #1.  Includes two $15 arcade game examples,
a 1020 picture dumper (color) program, and much more...

GOS Public Domain desktop-style program, includes PD source code in
Action!  This is the popular 1986 $5  GOS program.


##############################
<*> CODEBUSTER HELP
##############################
CTSY CompuServe SIG*Atari

Fm: Tim Hanson 72750,1014
To: SYSOP*Keith Joins 72347,75 (X)

1)  CODEBUST.HLP is all the docs you're going to get.  I loaded the file
    into Textpro and massaged the file until I had something readable.

2)  DOSXL only (or AtariDos, but definitely not Sparta).  I have an MIO
    partition set up for this.

3)  Everything is done from D1:.  Codebuster won't work with any other
    drive.  I booted the Dos from an MIO boot, put in a floppy with LABELS
    and my source machine language file on it, then went for the MIO
    switch.  After moving the floppy assignment to D1 (a real floppy) and
    CB.COM to D3, I loaded D3:CB.COM, which brought up the screen.  At
    this point I was in Codebuster with an almost blank floppy disk, ready
    to go to work.

4)  Every snivelling little step must be done manually.  First one must
     (a space between the command and the filename is not
    necessary, but drive assignments are not legal).  This loads the OS
    equates into the buffer and turns on the label attaching logic. LABELS
    contains a full set of both low and high memory equates in AMAC form.
    This must be the first step, since entering LABELS after entering code
    to be disassembled overwrites some code.

5)  Next  (open) as an output file.

6)   (read) loads your binary file into the buffer.
    Multiple load points and two blocks of code with the same load point,
    as in a short routine to write to the screen as the rest of the
    program loads, are separated.  Be careful about disassembling too much
    code; one only has one floppy on which to write source.  I loaded
    Textpro in a total of four loadpoints, and I split the main program
    into two pieces.

7)   sends output to disk.

8)   closes the output file after disassembly.

9)  <%FILENAME.EXT> reloads the output file and attaches the label logic.
                                                                              

******************************
<*>  800 OWNERS COLUMN
******************************

(Editors Note:)

There are a few articles in our archives that we haven't printed because 
they address the 400-800 Atari systems.  Of the 134 survey responses 
received to date, 50 or more respondents stated they still owned or used 
thier 800.

In an effort to keep this percentage of our readers interested, we will 
publish material written for or about the 800.  The following article was 
released in 1983 on CompuServe. (This is the place I found it a few years 
ago and recently came across it again.)


CARTRIDGE SWITCHES
by HOWARD SIEBENROCK

As you know, when you plug a ROM cartridge into the left slot of your
Atari 800 computer, you disable the top 8K of RAM. This is done by
disabling one input of an OR gate (Z102B) that normally passes the address
lines A15 and A14, decoded by chip Z101 to be S5, to the RAM slots. The S5
signal is wired to the left cartridge slot, pin 12, to enable the ROM
chips in the cartridge. Pin 14 of the cartridge is connected inside to the
+5 volt line. When the cartridge is inserted into the left slot this +5
volts is then connected to the Z102B OR gate to disable the S5 signal to
the RAM slots. The S5 signal is the address for 40K to 48K of RAM.

The right cartridge does the same thing, except it used A15 and A13,
decoded by Z101 as S4, for it's enable line. Pin 14, the +5 volt signal,
of the right cartridge, disables S4 to the RAM slots with OR gate Z102A.
The S4 signal is the address for 32K to 40K of the RAM.

If, while the cartridge is inserted, the +5 volt signal to the OR gate
could be opened, The RAM would then be enabled. If the S5 line to the left
cartridge is also opened, the cartridge chips data output would be tri-
stated. (tri-stated is a third binary output state for digital chips. It
is a high impedance state that electronically disconects the chip from the
data buss).

Since the address lines, A0 to A12, are inputs, they can be left on the
buss. By using a switch, mounted on the case, the programer can select if
RAM or the cartridge ROM is on the data buss. A second switch will do the
same for the right cartridge ROM.

If the S5 enable line, normally going to the left slot, is switched to the
right slot, the right cartridge will be addressed as a left cartridge. You
also have to switch the +5 volt signal from the right cartridge to the
Z102B gate to turn off the 40K to 48K RAM.

I must warn you. If your computer is under warranty, don't modify it!

The parts needed are two minature toggle switches. Both are double pole,
double throw, one is a two posistion (on-on), and the other is a three
posistion (on-off-on) switch. A two foot length of eignt conductor ribbon
cable (Unless you planed ahead and put in a ten conductor ribbon cable
with the reset modification last time) and 10-12 inch lengths of small
insulated wire.

Once you have the parts and tools, proceed to disemble the computer to the
mother board. Don't forget the CMOS handling caution!

_____ 1. Drill a hole near the center of the board for two small wires to
         pass through from the top to the bottom of the board.  Be careful
         not to drill near or through any circuit runs.  Hold the mother
         board up to a strong light to be able to see the runs on the
         bottom of the board and mark the location with a felt pen. 

_____ 2. Cut the five runs by making two cuts across the run about 1/16
         inch apart, then heat the 1/16 piece with a soldering iron until
         it lifts off the board.

  1) From R109 to left cartridge pin 14.
  2) From feed through to left cartridge pin 12.
  3) From Z102 pin 4 to left cartridge pin A.
  4) From Z102 pin 5 to feed through.
  5) From Z101 pin 5 to feed through.


_____ 3. Run an insulated jumper from Z102 pin 5 to Z101 pin 5.  Scrape
         the solder mask from the run just above where you made the cuts
         and solder the jumper to the run.  Be careful with the soldering
         iron, remember how easy it was to remove the 1/16 inch cut out
         piece? Check your work carefully as you go to be sure the wires
         are soldered good and there are no solder bridges between runs.

_____ 4. Mount the connector in the lower right courner of the mother
         board, if you did not do so last time. 

_____ 5. Run eight wires (I used small, solid, insulated telephone wire)
         from the cut circuit runs to the connector as follows. 

1) From R108 on the top through the hole to connector pin 5 on the bottom.
2) From Z101 pin 5 on the top through the hole to connector pin 6.
3) From left cartridge connector pin 1 to connector pin 7.
4) From left cartridge connector pin A to connector pin 8.
5) From left cartridge connector pin 12 to connector pin 3.
6) From left cartridge connector pin 14 to connector pin 4.
7) From R109 solder pad to connector pin 1.
8) From Z102 pin 2 (at the feed through) to pin 2.

_____ 6. Drill two holes and mount the cartridge select switches on the
         left of the case top. Be sure the center off switch is to the
         left when viewed from the top. 

_____ 7. The eight wires from the connector plug will now be connected.
         Above each wire write in the color of the wire you have coming
         from the connector plug. 

_____ 8. Solder the two jumpers from the right switch to the left switch.
         I used heat shrink tubing on all switch connections to be sure
         there are no stray wires to cause shorts. Connect the eight wires
         from the connector plug to the cartridge select switches. Then
         trace each wire to be sure they are connected properly!

_____ 9. Now is the time to check all of your work carefully to be sure
         there are no shorts or solder bridges or frayed wires any where,
         and that all connections are proper!

_____10. Reassemble your computer and cable it to your system. Install the
         BASIC cartridge in the left slot and set both switches ON (up).
         Leave the disk drive off and power up.  You should see the
         familiar READY prompt on the screen. If you don't then check that
         both switches are ON (up). If they are, then you have a mistake
         in your wiring. You will have to disemble the computer and check
         the wiring again. Be sure to check which pin you used as #1 on
         the new connector.

If at first you got the READY prompt then flip the left switch to the OFF
(center) position and do a COLD reset. You should now have the memo pad
title.  Flip the left switch down (RIGHT cartridge position) and do a COLD
reset. You should still have the memo pad title.

Flip both switches ON (up), and do a COLD reset. You should have the BASIC
ready prompt. In direct mode exicute the following command. ? FRE(0). The
number you see printed is the amount of free RAM you have. Make a note of
this number then install another cartridge in the RIGHT slot. With both
switches ON (up) you should get the BASIC ready prompt. Execute the ?
FRE(0) command again and compare the number printed on the screen with the
number you got before. It should be 8192 less. This is because the
cartridge in the right slot deselected 8K of RAM. Flip the RIGHT switch
OFF and do a COLD reset then exicute the command ? FRE(0) again. You
should get the original number on the screen, because the right cartridge
has been electronicly removed from the buss.

Flip the LEFT switch OFF (center position) and do a COLD reset. You should
now have the Memo pad title. Flip the LEFT switch to RIGHT (all the way
down) and do a COLD reset and you should see a screen appropriate to the
cartridge you have in the RIGHT slot.

Flip the LEFT switch ON and the RIGHT switch OFF and turn on the disk
drive. When the busy light goes out insert a diskette with DOS on it and
do a COLD reset. The screen should have the BASIC READY prompt, or what
ever is appropriate for the software on your diskette. Flip the LEFT
switch OFF (center posistion) and do a COLD reset. The disk should reboot
and come up with the DOS menu.

I could go on with many different uses for the CARTRIDGE SWITCHES and the
COLD RESET SWITCH, but I think you get the idea. One last idea.  If you
have a cartridge to disk copier, you can forget jamming the cover switch
and inserting the cartridge to be copied in the right slot with the power
on. Just insert the cartridge in the right slot and flip the RIGHT
cartridge switch OFF and close the cover. When the software instructs you
to insert the cartridge, just flip the RIGHT switch ON.

I hope you have enjoyed these articles, even if you don't attempt to do
them. If you have any comments or suggestions, fell free to write to me.

HOWARD SIEBENROCK
9309 W. 98 Court.
WESTMINSTER, COLORADO  80020


##############################
<*> ANALOG MARCH CONTENTS
##############################

FEATURES
--------
Cartridge Games for your XE......................David Plotkin
The addition of the XEGS to the Atari line has caused a resurgence of
cartridge-based games--old and new--and 130XE and XEGS owners both can
take advantage of the fun.


Disk Games for your XEGS.................Matthew J.W. Ratcliff
Did you know that, with the addition of a disk drive, all the disk-based
games for the 130XE computer will also run on the XE Game System?  Here's
a quick overview of some of the exciting games available now.


DUPing BASIC...................................Bill Bodenstein
This handy patch to DOS 2.5 will automatically switch BASIC on and off as
you enter and leave DOS.


Electra-Ball.....................................Frank Martone
A challenging, two-player game of strategy and reflexes written in Atari
BASIC.


Atari Videodisc System...........................Bruce Frumker
The secrets of controlling a laser videodisc from your Atari computer.


Pebbles.............................................Clive King
>From ancient Egypt comes this deceptively simple desert game using nothing
more than a few holes in the sand and a handful of stones.


Un-sprites.........................................Jason Leigh
Now you can have software-controlled sprites as well as Atari's Player/
Missile graphics.


REVIEWS
-------
Turboword (Micromiser Software)..........Matthew J.W. Ratcliff
Quintopus (Computer Software Services)...........Jim Patterson


COLUMNS
-------
Database DELPHI...............................Michael A. Banks
The End User................................Arthur Leyenberger
Game Design Workshop............................Craig Patchett


DEPARTMENTS
-----------
Editorial.......................................Clayton Walnum
Reader Comment................................................
8-bit News....................................................
M/L Editor......................................Clayton Walnum
BASIC Editor II.................................Clayton Walnum


******************************
<*> ARC SPEED TEST XT vs 130XE
******************************


Well, Atari users, cheer up.  I have run a preliminary speed test between
ARC version 5.12 for the IBM and ARC version 2.0 (UNARC version 2.3) for
the Atari.

Hardware:

 1. IBM XT DOS 3.3
        -Turbo card installed
        -internal hard disk
        -3.5 in. 720K floppy

 2. Atari 130XE 576K SpartaDOS 3.2
        -512K RAM DISK
        -2 INDUS GT disk drives
     
The IBM was used in and out of turbo mode. The test was run on the GOE.ARC
file downloaded from GENIE.
     
Here are the results:
     
           +--------------------------------+-----------------------+
           |                   ARC          |          UNARC        |
           +--------------------------------+-----------------------+
           |             IBM         IBM    |     IBM         IBM   |
           |          Hard Disk     Floppy  |  Hard Disk     Floppy |
           +---------+-----------+----------+-------------+---------+
           |Turbo In |   76      |   133    |     39      |    68   |
           |Turbo Out|  163      |   212    |     78      |   101   |
           +---------------------+----------+-------------+---------+
           |            Atari       Atari   |    Atari      Atari   |
           |          Ram Disk      Floppy  |  Ram Disk     Floppy  |
           +---------------------+----------+-------------+---------+
           |             58      |   301    |     26      |    232  |
           +---------------------+----------+-------------+---------+
     
     
As you can see the Atari with the Ram Disk was faster by 23.7% running
ARC, and 33.3% faster running UNARC compared to the IBM in turbo mode
(64.4% and 66.6% IBM out of turbo).

But the IBM beat the Atari running on the floppy disk. The IBM in turbo
mode was faster by 55.8% running ARC, and 70.7% running UNRC (29.6% and
56.5% IBM out of turbo mode).

It would be interesting to see the results of this test with the Atari
running under SpartDOS X and high speed disk access.  So what does this
test tell us? We all know about the slow disk drive access of the Atari.
If drive access speeds were equal on both computers, it looks like the 8
bit Atari would be a very tough competitor of the XT. Or is the ARC/UNARC
program for the Atari more efficient?


______________________________________
Xx IBM Monitor With Your XEP80
______________________________________
by Bob Woolley

If you read my earlier article in DL7 about the XEP80, you might remember
that the XEP80 uses all of the display field of the monitor and the two
cheap composite monitors that I had tried did not give a very satisfactory
display. I have been using a high quality video unit from a NorthStar
Horizon that works very well, but a monitor like that would be very
difficult for the average user to find (not to mention, expensive). I
spent some time at the West Coast Computer Faire looking for some
reasonable candidates, but none of the vendors had composite monochrome
monitors on display! There were lots of monochrome displays with seven
zillion lines of resolution, a built in swivel base, non-glare screens -
the works. Good prices, too! But every one was TTL, IBM. Wellll.........

Never being one to shy away from a little soldering, I decided to
investigate the possibility of adapting the XEP80 to an IBM monochrome
monitor. The IBM TTL monitors have a separate input for the sync and video
signals, whereas the XEP80 generates a composite signal containing all
three components. I figured that a little circuit to strip the Horizontal
and Vertical sync from the Video couldn't be that hard, but it turns out
that the XEP80 has all the signals you need inside the box!

The whole project didn't amount to anything more than soldering one end
of a 10" piece of four conductor ribbon cable onto the XEP80 board and
connecting a 9 pin joystick socket to the other end. I tried the XEP80 on
a standard IBM monochrome monitor and it worked fine! I also tried it on
some OEM TTL monitors made for an IBM PC (an AMDEK 310A and a SAMSUNG
MD1254G) and that also worked well.

After a little pot tweaking (a LOT of tweaking on the SAMSUNG). The XEP80
uses a lower Horizontal frequency than the IBM PC, so some OEM monitors
may require adjustment, but not so much that you need to re-adjust it
between a PC and your Atari. The display field on the TTL units does not
overscan the face of the tube so there is no adjustment required for that
problem. Also, the linearity is very good on these guys, so all the
characters look great!

The major disadvantage to a TTL monitor is the absence of audio on them,
although I prefer a separate audio amplifier anyway. [Enough babbling, I
waannnt one! How  do I do the mod, dummy??]

The wiring required is: (from the bottom of the XEP80 board)

Pin 1 and 2 of 9 pin socket to pin 7 of U6.

Pin 7 of 9 pin socket to the pad 1/4 inch to the left of pin 8 of U6.
(This pad is the same distance to the LEFT of pin 8 as pin 7 is to the
RIGHT of pin 8.)

Pin 8 of 9 pin socket to pin 9 of U6.

Pin 9 of 9 pin socket to pin 10 of U6.

I ran the flat cable out where the power switch is mounted. The bottom
cover will clamp the cable between the board and the bottom cover at this
point and provide some strain relief. I would imagine that you could use
a much longer cable, but at some point you will begin to lose character
resolution.

Now, you can take advantage of any good deals you might see on a quality
IBM monitor. I saw many different TTL units for less than $100 at the
WCCF. Most of them looked like much better devices than any composite
monitor I have seen and they are everywhere. If you are reasonably adept
at soldering, or know someone who is, think about using one of these TTL
monitors on your XEP80. The normal composite output is not affected by the
modification at all. Now, if I can hack an IBM keyboard onto this thing.....

Bob Woolley   [75126,3446]


##############################
<*>  ATARI8 RT TOP 100 DNLDS
##############################
Ctsy GEnie Atari8 Roundtable
Compiled by John Towns

Rank  F.No.  Filename         Date       Size     Accesses  Library
=========================================================================
1.    1908   ARCX12.COM       870329     11340     2422       16
2.    1909   ARC12.ARC        870329     13860     1130       16
3.     513   UNSCRUNCH.COM    860416     10080      950       16
4.    1718   ARCX.DOC         870205      6300      851       16
5.    3357   ALFCRUNCH12.ARC  880607     15120      748       16
6.    1209   WARBITCH,PIC     860818      7560      745       19
7.     144   NANCYCAMERON.TXT 860126     13860      624       19
8.    1523   XEVIOUS.COM      861213     10080      592       10
9.     514   SCRUNCH.DOC      860416      3780      589       16
10.   3317   AMODEM752.ARC    880530     61740      586        8
11.   1192   BITCH.PIC        860812      5040      571       19
12.   1413   COLUMN80.COM     861021      2520      559        2
13.    121   CLAUDIA.PIC      860114      6300      531       19
14.      8   MONOPOLY.BAS     851216     28980      529       10
15.   1470   WARGAMES86.BAS   861117     28980      514       10
16.   2289   SEVEN NUDES.ARC  870807     45360      511       19
17.   3469   ALFCRV14.ALF     880710     12600      510       16
18.   1190   HOTGIRL.PIC      860812      3780      505       19
19.   1119   SCRUNCH2.COM     860726     15120      496       16
20.   2258   FABULOUSBABE.COM 870727     32760      487       19
21.   2661   BLUETHUNDER.COM  871118     18900      475       10
22.   2799   DISKCOM32.ARC    880101     23940      471       16
23.    299   AMSPLAY.COM      860308      3780      454        4
24.   2191   TOS.COM          870629      7560      453        2
25.   1770   PRINTSHOPDISK4   870220     28980      428        7
26.   1207   DOS4.SCR         860817     86940      424       16
27.   1191   KANDI.PIC        860812      3780      424       19
28.   1144   HUTCHBBS.DOC     860731      6300      423       14
29.   1143   HUTCHBBS.SCR     860731     64260      420       14
30.   1767   PRINTSHOPDISK1   870220     39060      416        7
31.   2219   AMODEM75.ARC     870712     65520      414        8
32.     99   MIPRESENT.COM    860108     12600      410        4
33.   3013   NUDEMO.COM       880308     22680      409       19
34.   1395   TURBOBAS.DOC     861014     23940      404        2
35.   1676   GR9LODR.BAS      870124      2520      396        4
36.   2041   EROTICAX.BAS     870508     27720      395       10
37.   2774   DDII1.ARC        871227     55440      390       15
38.   1754   RATEDXXX.PSF     870215      1260      389       19
39.    540   WILDDEMO.COM     860418      3780      382        5
40.   1394   TURBOBASXL.COM   861014     18900      380        2
41.   2766   EMPIRE.COM       871223     17640      377       10
42.   1901   PRINTSHOPPRINTER 870329     12600      357       15
43.   2702   NUDECALENDAR.TXT 871130     11340      355       19
44.   1011   GAUNTLET.COM     860618     31500      354       10
45.   1105   GOSDUP.SCR       860722     61740      350        2
46.   2843   CADXE.ARC        880116     64260      347        4
47.   1350   GOSDUP2.SCR      860928     47880      344       16
48.   1768   PRINTSHOPDISK2   870220     30240      343        7
49.    987   ROBONUDE.PIC     860611      3780      341        6
50.    685   DEADSTICK.BAS    860504     22680      341       10
51.   2552   ARCX.HLP         871025      8820      339        1
52.   1127   PRINTSHOPTOOL    860727     13860      339       15
53.   2037   UNICORN.COM      870506     13860      336       10
54.   2320   DISKINDEX3.ARC   870820     28980      334       16
55.   1769   PRINTSHOPDISK3   870220     26460      334        7
56.   2775   DDII2.ARC        871227     51660      333       15
57.   1711   SCREENCLOCK.BAS  870203      2520      333        2
58.   2861   ORBITAL.COM      880124     30240      332       10
59.   3929   MYDOS45M.ARC     881129     85680      330        2
60.   2776   DDII3.ARC        871227     17640      328       15
61.   1231   ICONSHOP.SCR     860825     27720      323        4
62.   2015   EARTH.COM        870501     27720      320        7
63.   2471   VIDEOBLITZ.COM   871001     50400      317        7
64.   1965   ACEC.ARC         870415     65520      316        2
65.   1782   STARTREK.ARC     870222     25200      316       10
66.    833   STARTREK         860521     20160      314       10
67.   3406   TOP100.TXT       880614      7560      310        1
68.   1551   LADYX.BAS        861221     15120      310       19
69.    675   VT100.DOC        860430     11340      310        8
70.   1561   JUKEBOX.COM      861227      3780      308        5
71.   1161   EVE.PIC          860804      5040      307       19
72.   1834   WHEELOF.ARC      870318     47880      305       10
73.    664   AMISFUNC         860429      1260      303       14
74.   2176   READARC.BAS      870623      3780      302        2
75.   1957   ARCQUEST.ARC     870409      3780      300       16
76.   2329   RLESHOW3.ARC     870826     20160      299        4
77.   2178   XEHIRES.ARC      870625     30240      298        4
78.   1473   TURBORUN.COM     861119     11340      298        2
79.   2221   BINBAS.ARC       870712      6300      297       16
80.   2135   XAGON.COM        870610     18900      296       10
81.    242   DOSPLUS.TXT      860302      2520      296       16
82.    211   AMPHIBIAN2.COM   860222     11340      292       10
83.   2476   ATARIWAV.ARC     871002     11340      291        7
84.    348   BOOKKEEP.BAS     860316     12600      288        9
85.   1250   SHRINK.COM       860904      5040      286       16
86.   1138   PROBOWL.COM      860728     17640      286       10
87.   1845   STORMR.PIC       870321      2520      284       19
88.   1903   STARLORD.ARC     870329     44100      283       10
89.   1322   BOWLING2.BAS     860924     13860      283       10
90.   3337   LIBDIR1.ARC      880602     28980      282        1
91.   2477   POPDEMO.ARC      871002     40320      280        7
92.   1134   ATARIBBS.TXT     860727     23940      280       11
93.   1014   DSKLIB122.BAS    860619     16380      278       16
94.   2115   ROCKS.COM        870601      7560      276       10
95.   1500   TURBOCOMPILER    861130      6300      275        2
96.   1130   CARRIE.PSF       860727      1260      272       19
97.    663   ARUNCRE.BBS      860429      2520      271       14
98.   1967   FONTMASTER.ARC   870418     45360      269       15
99.   1698   VT100V07.COM     870130     11340      269        8
100.  1025   DEMENU.BAS       860623      5040      267       16

=========================================================================
                           Syndicate ZMagazine
                         Syndicate Publishing Co.
                            Post Office Box 74
                       Middlesex, New Jersey 08846
            Issue #141       January 23, 1989    (c)SPC, 1989
=========================================================================




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