Visit Atarimax Store


Free-Net Logo
The Atari SIG Historical Archive
Created and hosted by: atarimax.com
[ HOME | GO ATARI | 8-BIT | ST/TT | PORTFOLIO | LYNX | JAGUAR | LIBRARY ]


Article #321 (730 is last):
From: aa789@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Bruce D. Nelson)
Newsgroups: freenet.sci.comp.atari.mags
Subject: Z*Net: 13-Dec-92 #9222
Reply-To: aa789@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Bruce D. Nelson)
Posted-By: xx004 (aa789 - Bruce D. Nelson)
Date: Tue Dec 15 23:09:07 1992



 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 ##########(((((((((( ##########((( ##(( ##((((((( ##(((((((( ##########
 #################(( ####(( ####(((( #(( ##(( ##########(( #############
 ##############(( #####(((((( ##(( (( (( ##((((( #######(( #############
 ###########(( ##########(( ####(( #(((( ##(( ##########(( #############
 ##########(((((((((( ##########(( ##((( ##((((((( #####(( #############
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 #######################################################################
 
                       Z*NET: ATARI ONLINE MAGAZINE
                       ----------------------------
 
    December 13, 1992          Issue #22          Volume 7, Number 22
 
             Copyright (c)1992, Syndicate Publishing Company

          ~ Publisher/Editor..........................Ron Kovacs
          ~ Senior Editor..............................John Nagy
          ~ Assistant Editor...........................Ed Krimen
          ~ Writer............................Michael R. Burkley
          ~ Writer.....................................Bob Smith
          ~ Z*Net News Service NZ.....................Jon Clarke
 
          $ GEnie Address..................................Z-NET
          $ CompuServe Address........................75300,1642
          $ Delphi Address..................................ZNET
          $ Internet/Usenet Address................status.gen.nz
          $ America Online Address......................ZNET1991
          $ AtariNet Address...........................51:1/13.0

      * Z*Net: News Service FNET 593  AtariNet 51:1/13 (908) 968-8148
      * Z*Net: Golden Gate  FNET 706  AtariNet 51:1/9  (510) 373-6792
      * Z*Net: S. Pacific   FNET 693  New Zealand

                             **--CONTENTS--**
 
 
 
           ## The Editors Desk......................Ron Kovacs
           ## Z*Net Newswire........................Ron Kovacs
           ## 1992: Year In Review - Part 1.........Ron Kovacs
           ## Join A Music Coalition..........................
           ## AtariNet, Network Overview......................
           ## Perusing GEnie.........................Ed Krimen
           ## Open Letter To Atari Users.......Nathan Potechin
           ## Z*Net Calendar........................Ron Kovacs
           ## The Unabashed Atariophile........Michael Burkley
 
 
 ######  THE EDITORS DESK
 ######  By Ron Kovacs
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 Due to the horrible storm that hit our area this week, we have not been
 able to produce a regular edition.  However, since our phone lines have
 cleared up, downed trees have been removed and communications links are
 beginning to open up, we will release this issue on Sunday.
 
 The Noreaster that hit this area was "The Storm of The Century" as 
 called by local newscasters and weathermen.  There were wind gusts of
 over 60 miles and hour, heavy rain which turned to snow.  In northern
 areas here, snow was the only product of the storm which piled to over
 30 inches.
 
 The storm began last Thursday and still effects our area today, Sunday.
 However, many lucked out while others, especially those in New York, 
 Long Island and coastal New Jersey have lost homes and property.  Not a
 very nice Chirstmas is being offered to these people this year.
 
 This week we will being the Year in Review 1992 along with our regular
 columns.

  
 
 ######  Z*NET NEWSWIRE
 ######  Edited by Ron Kovacs
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 Headlines:
                         Falcon bundled with D2D
                       Injunction Against Microsoft
                  Massive layoffs being considerd by IBM
                     Syquest Technology files lawsuit
                    Fujitsu develops first 256MB DRAM
                 Free upgrade available from WordPerfect
 
 
 FALCON BUNDLED WITH D2D
 D2D Software is being bundled with the Falcon.  This product is a basic
 direct-to-disk recorder and simple cut-and-paste editor.  D2D Edit,
 another product, is a fully-professional version with SMPTE drive and a
 cue sheet-type editor.  Also, 4T/FX is a multi-track program that
 provides mixing of the four channels and two effects (reverb, echo,
 flange, or distortion, etc., in any combination of two).  It is going to
 range $500-$600.
 
 
 NEWSLETTER REPORTS INJUNCTION
 The "FTC: Watch" newsletter has reported that attorneys sent an informal
 250-page report to commissioners last week, suggesting they consider
 seeking a court-imposed injunction against practices related to the sale
 of Microsoft's DOS operating system using Intel Corp.'s microprocessors.
 Rivals of Microsoft, have been complaining that the company uses
 predatory practices in selling its operating systems, which give the
 basic commands to personal computers.  Microsoft offers discounts to
 makers of personal computers that agree to pay for a copy of DOS
 software for every personal computer they sell.  Some rivals, such as
 Quarterdeck, have decided to stop marketing operating system software to
 PC makers because of Microsoft's dominance.
 
 
 MASSIVE LAYOFFS BEING CONSIDERED BY IBM
 Directors of IBM are being summoned to a special meeting next week amid
 reports the computer-maker is considering a downsizing initiative,
 including massive layoffs, that could cost up to $3 billion.  A
 spokesman at IBM headquarters refused to comment on the meeting.  The
 IBM board does not normally meet in December.  This year, IBM has
 already taken restructuring charges of $5.4 billion - before taxes - to
 cover costs associated with the planned elimination of 40,000 jobs.  The
 company has been downsizing for six years.  By the end of the year, the
 IBM staff will have been reduced by more than 85,000 from its 1986 peak
 of 407,000.
 
 
 SYQUEST FILES LAWSUIT
 SyQuest has filed a lawsuit in California Superior Court against Nomai
 S.A., a French start-up company, and Srinivasan "Ravi" Chari, a former
 technical consultant to SyQuest, for theft of trade secrets, unfair
 competition and other wrongful acts.  The court has issued a temporary
 restraining order enjoining Chari and anyone acting with him from
 developing, manufacturing, marketing, distributing and selling removable
 5.25 inch Winchester disk cartridges for use in SyQuest drives.  SyQuest
 is currently the only manufacturer of cartridges for use with SyQuest
 disk drives.
 
 
 FUJITSU FIRST 256MB DRAM
 Fujitsu has developed the world's first 256-megabit-DRAM chip.  The new
 chip, measuring two by two centimetres, can store 64 times the amount of
 data as current DRAM (Direct Random Access Memory) chips.  The new chip
 will be ready for serial production in 1996.
 
 
 FREE UPGRADE AVAILABLE FOR WORDPERFECT
 Users who purchase WordPerfect Office version 3.1 for DOS and Windows,
 or WordPerfect Office 3.03 for the Macintosh between October 13, 1992,
 and the initial release of WordPerfect Office 4.0 will receive a free
 upgrade.  WordPerfect Office 4.0, scheduled for release at the end of
 first quarter 1993, is an electronic mail, personal calendaring and
 group scheduling program.  A trade-up platform administration package
 will also be available for $220 with additional licenses ranging from
 $25 to $30.

  

 ######  Z*NET NEWS YEAR IN REVIEW (Part 1)
 ######  By Ron Kovacs
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 Once again it is that time of the year where we present the year in
 review.  There are going to be columns addressing the topic during the
 next few weeks that detail different aspects of this year.  What I am
 going to do is focus on the news we covered in Z*Net and AEO (issues
 that we produced), from the Z*Net Newswire and feature articles.
 
 To begin 1992, we must go back to December 1991.
 
 December 1991
 
 Antic Publishing, Inc. is said to be planning to dissolve the
 corporation at year's end, 1991, taking its debts with it.  PC HOME
 JOURNAL, Antic's other publication, is expected to be spun off to a
 legally new and unrelated corporation as of January 1, 1992.
 
 The announced and expected CDAR505 will NOT be produced at any time
 soon.  Intended for a fall 1991 release, the unit would be identical to
 cheaper drives already on the market, making it a loss proposition for
 Atari.  They will now promote the use of the 500+meg devices by
 releasing METADOS into the community as freeware.  User can roll their
 own players just as they do hard drive now.
 
 The STylus pad-based ST that was said to be the future of computing and
 was at one time expected to be the "WOW" unit at COMDEX is tabled by
 Atari after market studies show that buyers are curious, but not willing
 to buy one.
 
 Darek Mihocka searches for a buyer of Quick ST as he prepares to leave
 the ST market and finish development of his Gemulator, to allow ST
 software users to follow him into the PC marketplace.  Now working for
 Microsoft, Darek has become an advocate of MS-DOS.
 
 The Lynx is finally a major hit, with demand outstripping production
 ability.  New dealer penetration will have to wait until after
 Christmas, as all current production is already pre-sold.
 
 FSM GDOS is about ready to go to market, as soon as the packaging is
 ready for dealer sale.  It is expected in early January at about $50.
 
 The Portfolio is selling well, at double the rate it was before the
 double-priced and well promoted competition arrived from Hewlett
 Packard.
 
 The winners of Atari's STe/TT demo contest are announced.  Noel Saw and
 Arvin Castillo win an Atari TT030 for their massive entry.
 
 Calamus S is scheduled to be released by ISD on December 15.
 
 Atari stock is down to $ 1 3/4 at the close of 1991.
 
 CodeHead Software announced the TEC -- the TOS Extension Card!  This
 circuit board, developed by Germany's Artifex, allows you to use the
 very latest version of Atari TOS (2.06) in your existing 520ST, 1040ST,
 or Mega ST!
 
 Codehead also announced that effective January 1992, they will be taking
 over development and distribution for Quick ST Version 3.0.  Darek
 Mihocka, the original creator of Quick ST, sold the product to spend 
 more time developing a PC based Atari ST emulator.
 
 Gribnif Software announces the release of "XBoot - The Boot Manager"
 program for the Atari ST, TT and compatible personal computers.
 
 John Townsend from Atari Corp. states that with HDX 3.0x and above,
 "you can create partitions that are a maximum of 256 Megabytes.  That
 means that the whole SyQuest cart could be one partition, but I would
 recommend at least two."  He adds, "Remember, the smaller the
 partition... the fast[er] the read/write access will be.  With big
 partitions, you will have a slower drive as the drive get[s] full."
 
 January 1992
 
 WordPerfect offered a special First Quarter 1992 Competitive Trade-Up
 for customers who currently own any version of WordPerfect for Amiga,
 Apple IIe/c or IIGS, or Atari.  Customers could trade-up to WordPerfect
 5.1 for DOS, WordPerfect 5.1 for Windows, or WordPerfect 2.1 for
 Macintosh for $150.US/$179.CN, or they can trade up to LetterPerfect for
 $89.US/$110.CN.
 
 Lexicor Software offered it's Virtual Cinematography and Graphics Arts
 Class.  The classes covered; Tweening, 3D Objects and Motion, Finishing
 Animations and many others.  These were online classes, being held on
 CompuServe and GEnie.
 
 The editorial staff of ST-INFORMER, a popular monthly Atari tabloid-
 format publication, walked off the job on January 6, and plan to create
 their own rival Atari magazine.  According to Mike Lindsay, Oregon-based
 editor for ST-INFORMER since its inception nearly four years ago, the
 breakup is the result of a long-standing disagreement over ownership of
 the magazine.  Brian Gockley is the new editor-in-chief.
 
 Greg Pratt leaves Atari as President for a new position with Creative
 Labs, Inc., makers of the "Sound Blaster" series of sound cards for
 MS-DOS computers.
 
 Atari Canada released details on new package purchase plans.  The
 packages which include an educational institute, registered company
 employee purchase programs and non-profit agencies.  The pricing
 structure, options and flexible payment plan ensures that a computer is
 within the budget of anyone even in these economically troubled times.
 
 The backstreets of the Atari community were abuzz with the word that
 Atari Corp was being, in fact had already been sold by the Tramiel
 family.  However, official comment from Sunnyvale (after the Pratt
 announcement) was "Absolutely not."
 
 Taylor Ridge Books announces the release of The ST Assembly Language
 Workshop, Volume 1, a novice's guide to assembly language programming on
 the Atari ST.
 
 Atari announces that the one millionth game cartridge was sold for the
 Lynx video game system.
 
 Shadowsoft which brought out the classic Robotron with Williams/Bally,
 will put Joust on store shelves in April or May and will introduce two
 original titles; a puzzle game and a superhero title for the Lynx.
 
 The new Atari SM147 premiered at the National Association of Music
 Merchandisers show.  The SM147 is a 14" paperwhite monitor with a flat
 screen.
 
 Atari announces the inception of a new business division named Atari
 Music.  James Grunke will lead this new division and commented, "Atari
 has always done a good job making computers with a lot of power and
 benefits for the money."
 
 Computer Chronicles, the PBS program with over 700,000 viewers was on
 hand filming at the NAMM show.  They focused on Atari in the MIDI field
 and Atari Music.
 
 Atari announces at NAMM that it's products will be serviced by the 250
 strong General Electric Service Center network though the United States
 and Canada.
 
 Dr. T's announced a new Audio/Video production kit for the Atari ST.
 The package includes the Omega music sequencing and editing environment,
 Hitman cue sheet production tools, and Phantom SMPTE syncronizer.
 
 Gribnif Software has announced the release of the "Crazy Dots" video
 display adapter.  The adapter allows the Atari computer to drive a
 variety of VGA, Multi-Sync, and other high end color and gray scale
 displays.
 
 Bill Rehbock announces that Atari will make all of the released TOS
 development information available to the general public.  An order form
 is included in the annoucement for purchasing the Atari TOS Developer's
 Kit.
 
 Atari was virtually the only computer being seriously shown at the
 National Association of Music Merchants show.  The Atari area was the
 largest yet at any NAMM, apropos of Atari's new commitment to its
 official new Music Division headed up by James Grunke.  An open area
 accommodated as many as 25 work stations manned in COMDEX fashion with
 a host of third party developers.  They included music specialty
 developers Hybrid Arts, Thinkware, Roland, Steinberg-Jones, Dr.T's,
 C-LAB, Fostex, JLCooper, Interval, Pixel, Korg, Hotz, and many more,
 each showing off their latest products for the Atari platform.
 
 Atari Advantage Magazine, from the creators of ST Informer Magazine is
 announced.
 
 ISD announces Calamus SL.  SL marks the transformation of Calamus from
 a desktop publishing program to an expansive DTP environment.
 
 The Boston Computer Society announces that a meeting in April will
 feature a special presentation and announcement of new hardware from
 Atari Corporation.  (The Falcon)
 
 ST-Informer returns in a newsprint-with-color book format similar to
 AtariUser magazine, publisher and now editor Rod Macdonald has enlisted
 the aid of Brian Gockley on the East coast, Donovan Vicha covering the
 central USA, and Robert Goff in the West, as principal contributors.
 
 Atari Explorer Magazine releases copies of their February 1992 issues
 BEFORE the January 1992 issue.  The February issue was a special MIDI
 issue, including a mini-magazine inside called ATARI ARTIST.
 
 Ericsson GE released the Mobidem, the first mass market portable
 wireless modem.

 Next week we continue through our tour of 1992...
 
 
 
 ######  JOIN COMPUTER MUSICIAN COALITION!
 ######  A World of Electronic Music Excitement Awaits You!
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 WHAT IS CMC?  Computer Musician Coalition
 CMC is a worldwide coalition of individuals and institutions dedicated
 to the advancement of electronics and computers used in music
 applications.  CMC encourages the creation and appreciation of music
 created using high technology.  CMC brings together people of many
 perspectives and careers with the common goal of excellence in music
 through the effective use of electronic and computer technology.
 
 WHO JOINS CMC?
 Everyone With A Taste For Fresh, Excellent, And Entertaining New
 Experiences in Music!
 
 The CMC membership includes individuals and institutions with diverse
 musical appreciations.  Members come from all walks of life, but all
 have the same desire to experience and participate in the advancement of
 electronics in musical composition, production, arrangement, and
 performance.
 
 YOU SHOULD JOIN TOO!  CMC Member Categories
 CMC memberships are open to anyone who supports the purposes of CMC and
 wishes to receive CMC publications and services.  There are four
 membership categories -- Connoisseur, Artist, Dealer and Vendor.  Each
 category is specifically designed to benefit and encourage participation
 by each membership group.
 
 CMC MEMBER CATEGORY BENEFITS:  CONNOISSEUR MEMBERSHIP
 Open to any individual who supports the purposes of CMC and wishes to
 receive CMC publications and services.
 
 AFTERTOUCH CATALOG SUBSCRIPTION
 CMC members receive a six-issue subscrition to AFTERTOUCH, CMC's
 bimonthly catalog of New Electronic Music Discoveries.
 
 AFTERTOUCH SAMPLER TAPES
 CMC members receive six AFTERTOUCH Sampler tapes.  Samplers include
 compositions from associated AFTERTOUCH catalogs.
 
 AFTERTOUCH CATALOG BINDER
 CMC members receive a handsome binder used to store AFTERTOUCH catalogs
 and materials.
 
 AFTERTOUCH SAMPLER STORAGE CASE
 CMC members receive a storage case which organizes the AFTERTOUCH
 sampler tape library.
 
 AFTERTOUCH PURCHASE DISCOUNTS
 CMC members receive a special price list of reduced member prices for
 AFTERTOUCH tapes, CDs and videos.
 
 AFTERTOUCH VOTING RIGHTS
 With each sampler tape, CMC members receive an AFTERTOUCH voters'
 ballot.  Members are invited to vote for their favorite artists and
 compositions on the sampler.  These votes are used to help decide
 AFTERTOUCH artist awards.
 
 Returned ballots are collected and, at season's end, twenty are chosen
 randomly.  The CMC members whose names appear on the selected ballots
 will take part in the process to decide the final awards.  These twenty
 members will receive the complete library of nominated albums, utilize
 them to make their final selections, and keep the albums for their
 personal pleasure.
 
 AFTERTOUCH AWARDS SAMPLER
 CMC members receive an annual AFTERTOUCH Awards Collection sampler tape.
 This tape includes sample compositions from the winning artists' albums.
 
 AFTERTOUCH SURVEY CREDITS
 CMC members who complete and return the rating surveys supplied with
 each and every album purchased will receive one 25 cent coupon per
 survey.  These coupons may be applied toward the future purchase of
 tapes and CD's from AFTERTOUCH catalogs.
 
 AFTERTOUCH GROWTH INCENTIVE
 Any CMC member who brings in additional new members may pick free one
 AFTERTOUCH album per new member.
 
 AFTERTOUCH UNCONDITIONAL GUARANTEE
 CMC members receive an unconditional guarantee that every album
 purchased must be pleasing.  If for any reason an album is not
 appreciated, it may be returned for credit toward a future purchase.

 ARTIST MEMBERSHIP
 Open to any individual or record label who wishes to have their music
 marketed by CMC, supports the purposes of CMC and wishes to receive CMC
 publications and services.  ARTIST MEMBERS RECIEVE ALL CONNOISSEUR
 MEMBER BENEFITS AND THE FOLLOWING:
 
 CMC/PAN CONNECTION
 Artist members receive a free membership in PAN -- the Performing
 Artists' Network -- usually $225.  With a modem and computer, artist
 members have access to a wealth of professional musician information and
 immediate communication with CMC headquarters.
 
 AFTERTOUCH VIP SUPPORT
 Artist Members receive priority handling for music submissions.  Members
 option to appear on sampler tapes and entry in the awards program.
 Artist Members are exclusively chosen to appear in the PERSONAL TOUCH
 profile column.  Artist Members receive fifteen copies of the AFTERTOUCH
 volume in which their music appears.
 
 EXTENDED PROMOTIONAL SUPPORT
 Artist Members receive the opportunity to have their music promoted in
 various international AFTERTOUCH advertising campaigns and appear on
 additional promotional projects.  Artist Members' music is promoted to
 radio stations and magazines for potential review and airplay.  Artist
 Members receive follow-up promotion in all AFTERTOUCH volumes.
 
 DEALER MEMBERSHIP
 Open to any company that retails products or services which benefit CMC
 members, supports the purposes of CMC and wishes to receive CMC
 publications and services.  CMC DEALER MEMBERS RECEIVE ALL CONNOISSEUR
 MEMBER BENEFITS AND THE FOLLOWING:
 
 DEALER VIP BENEFITS
 Dealer Members receive a free membership in PAN, twenty-five copies of
 AFTERTOUCH catalogs per volume, a listing in the AFTERTOUCH Dealer
 Directory, dicounts on AFTERTOUCH Samplers and selected albums purchased
 for resale, one free 2" ad in AFTERTOUCH, discounts on AFTERTOUCH
 advertising rates, and an invitation to participate in various
 cooperative promotional campaigns.
 
 VENDOR MEMBERSHIP
 Open to any company that makes products of offers services which benefit
 CMC members, support the purposes of CMC and wishes to receive CMC
 publications and services.  CMC VENDOR MEMBERS RECEIVE ALL CONNOISSEUR
 MEMBER BENEFITS AND THE FOLLOWING:
 
 VENDOR VIP BENEFITS
 Vendor Members receive a free membership in PAN, a listing in the
 AFTERTOUCH Vendor Directory, a company profile write-up in AFTERTOUCH,
 regular informational write-ups in AFTERTOUCH which help CMC members to
 better understand the company and its products, twenty-five copies of
 AFTERTOUCH per volume, discounts on AFTERTOUCH advertising rates, and an
 invitation to participate in various cooperative promotional campaigns.
 
 CMC MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS
 In addition to the benefits stated above, CMC members receive a
 membership certificate worth framing, a CMC "MIDI Doesn't Byte" button,
 a CMC T-shirt, a survey response program wherein listeners communicate
 with artists and vice versa, a toll free phone number for placing orders
 and asking questions, the joy of participating in the musical wave of
 the future and, finally, unannounced program benefits which we are not
 at liberty to discuss currently, but will amaze and surprise.
 
 So there you have it folks!  If your involved in electronic music at
 all, be it as a listener, artist, dealer, or vendor, you owe it to
 yourself to checkout CMC!  If your interested, just Email me your name,
 address, and what membership type your interested in and I'll have CMC
 mail you an info.  Packet and a free issue of the AFTERTOUCH catalog.
 My Email address is: S.GARRIGUS.  (On GEnie)
 
 

 ######  ATARINET
 ######  Network Overview
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 So, you've heard about AtariNet.  This is a network for any BBS that
 supports the Atari platform of home computer.  There are already several
 bulletin board systems worldwide participating and more are joining.  A
 listing of the current BBS's that are participating and the echos that
 are available follow:
 
 Zone 51 AtariNet Headquarters
 Region 100
 Host 1 - Twilight Zone, Longwood FL, Bill Scull
          1-407-831-1613
 
 4  - Steal Your Face, Brick NJ, Ed Lynch              1-908-920-7981
 6  - MySTery BBS, Goose Creek, SC, David Blanchard    1-803-556-9730
 8  - Alien BBS, Burlington NC, Mark Cline             1-919-229-4334
 9  - Z*Net Golden Gate, Sunnyvale CA, Bob Brodie      1-510-373-6792
 10 - Atari Base, Sunnyvale CA, Robert Brodie          1-408-745-2196
 11 - Sunfox's Realm, Orlando Fl, Erik Williams        1-407-384-8138
 13 - Z*Net News Service, Middlesex NJ, Ron Kovacs     1-908-968-8148
 
 Host 4 - Hologram Inc, Old Bridge NJ, Dean Lodzinski
          1-908-727-1914
 
 3  - Assasins Grove, Oshawa Canada, Jeff Mitchell     1-416-571-6965
 4  - Aces High BBS, Matawan NJ, Richard Guadagno      1-908-290-1133
 5  - StormShadow, Pasadena MD, Robert Lovelace        1-410-437-0243
 
 Region 200 - AtariNet Headquarters II
 
 Host 2 - AtariNet Nevada, Las Vegas NV, Terry May
          1-702-435-0786
 
 4  - Sports Line BBS, Henderson NV, Nick Hard         1-702-565-5271
 5  - Left Over Hippies, Toronto Canada, Lesley Dylan  1-416-466-8931
 10 - STarship, Lake Charles LA, Rich Tietjens         1-318-474-9432
 11 - The Choice BBS, Las Vegas NV, Mark Woolworth     1-702-253-6527
 12 - Thunder Hold, American Fork UT, Todd Harrington  1-801-756-2901
 13 - Conqueror Connection, Fort Hood TX, John Curtis  1-817-539-1469
 
 Host 201 - The DarkSTar BBS, Salt Lake City UT, Randy Rodrock
            1-801-269-8780
 
 5  - Acme BBS, Salt Lake City UT, Eric Nikolaisen     1-801-272-4243
 
 Host 202 - The Wylie Connection, Wylie TX, Wes Newell
            1-214-442-6612
 
 7  - Aaron's Beard, Dallas TX, Troy Wade              1-214-557-2642
 13 - The Wylie Connection, Wylie TX, Wes Newell       1-214-442-6612
 20 - Outland Station, Ft Worth TX, John Stiborek      1-817-329-1125
 21 - Psychlo Empire, Irving TX, Mark Corona           1-214-251-1175
 
 Host 203 - AtariNet Midwest, Indianapolis IN, Bill Jones
            1-317-356-5519
 
 1  - The Zoo BBS, Indianapolis IN, Bill Jones         1-317-356-5519
 2  - The Music Station, Webb City MO, Chris Richards  1-417-673-4926
 3  - The Maligned ST, Urbandale IA, Mike O'Malley     1-515-253-9530
 4  - The Crawly Crypt, Joplin MO, Jim Collins         1-417-624-1887
 
 Region 300 - AtariNet Headquarters_III
 Host 3 - The Space Station, Canyon Country CA, Tony Castorino
          1-805-252-0450
 
 3  - Atari ST Connection, Fresno CA, Brian Watters    1-209-436-8156
 4  - Autoboss Atari Elite, Bunola PA, John Graham     1-412-384-5608
 5  - The Yakima Atari ST BBS, Yakima WA, Pat Moffitt  1-509-965-2345
 6  - FIDOdoor Support BBS, Vandenberg AFB, Bryan Hall 1-805-734-4742
 7  - cyberSecT BBS, Cheney WA, Chuck Aude             1-509-235-4875
 9  - The Mosh Bit, Vancouver WA, Mark Wallaert        1-206-574-1531
 10 - Target Range, Paramount CA, Alan Dietrich        1-310-634-8993
 11 - Sanctuary From The Law, Inyokern CA, Sean Price  1-619-377-3611
 12 - MASATEK, Torrance CA, Valeriano Meneses          1-310-518-9524
 13 - The Mind Keep, Citrus Heights CA, Jeff Fehlman   1-916-723-1657
 14 - Callahan's Place, Ashford WA, Brian Lane         1-206-569-2911
 15 - ST-Keep, Citrus Heights CA, Andrew Studer        1-916-729-2968
 16 - H.B. SMOG, Huntington Beach CA, Jim Thingwold    1-714-969-5486
 17 - Acey BBS, Yakima WA, Dick Grable                 1-509-966-8555
 
 Region 400 - AtariNet Headquarters IV
 Host 5 - The Brewery, Ajax ON Canada, Don Liscombe
          1-416-683-3089
 
 3  - Rather Digital, Sudbury ON Canada, Steve Barnes  1-705-560-3115
 
 Region 500 - AtariNet UK
 Host 6 - AtariNet NW England, Stockport Cheshire UK, Daron Brewood
          44-61-429-9803
 
 2  - STun NeST Central, Stockport Cheshire UK         44-61-429-9803
 3  - DigiBBS, Nykobing F Denmark, Flemming Nielsen    45-54-858385
 
 Region 600 - AtariNet Headquarters VI
 Host 501 - AtariNet Germany, Koeln Germany, Frank Brodmuehler
            49-221-248285
 
 8  - Apolonia, Essen, Peter Kaszanics                 49-201-237509
 
 Hub 100 - Hub AC, Aachen, Benedikt Heinen             49-241-408593
     101 - Firemark BBS, Aachen, Benedikt Heinen       49-241-408593
     102 - Dao-Lin-H'ay, Luegde, Joerg Spilker         49-5281-79372
     103 - AtariNET, Milano Italy, Magic.Alex Badalic  39-382-488-515
 
 
               |||   AtariNet EchoList -- 31-Oct-92   |||
              / | \  Compiled by Terry May @ 51:2/0  / | \
 
 -> The following echo is _required_ for ALL AtariNet sysops.
 -> ONLY AtariNet sysops may have access to this echo.
 
 Echo Name        Description                      Moderator
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 A_SYSOP          AtariNet SysOps                  51:1/0  - Bill Scull
 
 -> The following echoes are _required_ for AtariNet moderators
 -> and hosts, but may be picked up by ANY AtariNet sysop.
 -> ONLY AtariNet sysops may have access to this echo.
 
 Echo Name        Description                      Moderator
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 A_ECHO           AtariNet echoes discussion       51:2/0  - Terry May
 A_TEST           AtariNet test echo               51:1/0  - Bill Scull
 
 -> The following echoes are available to all interested AtariNet sysops.
 -> These echoes can and should be accessible to all users and points.
 
 Echo Name        Description                      Moderator
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 A_4SALE          Atari products for sale/wanted   51:1/11  - E Williams
 A_ATARI          Atari general discussion         51:2/4   - Nick Hard
 A_BBS_ADS        Atari supported BBSes            51:2/0   - Terry May
 A_BBS_DOORS      Atari BBS doors (externals)      51:1/6   - D Blanchard
 A_COMMERCIAL_ADS Atari Commercial Ads             51:1/11  - E Williams
 A_DTP            Atari DeskTop Publishing         51:1/11  - E Williams
 A_EXPLORER       Atari Explorer Magazine          51:1/13  - Ron Kovacs
 A_FIDODOOR       FIDOdoor Support                 51:3/6   - Bryan Hall
 A_GENERAL        General discussion               51:2/4   - Nick Hard
 A_GRAPHICS       Atari graphics                   51:2/0   - Terry May
 A_PROGRAMMING    Atari programming                51:5/0   - D Liscombe
 A_SOUND          Atari sound/music                51:2/0   - Terry May
 A_TECH           Atari hardware tech talk         51:202/0 - Wes Newell
 A_ZNET           Z*Net Online Magazine
 A_BINKLEY        BinkleyTerm ST support           [ Gated from Zone 1 ]
 A_FIDO_ST        FidoNet ST discussion            [ Gated from Zone 90 ]
 A_IOS_HELP       IOSmail Support                  [ Gated from Zone 1 ]


 
 ######  PERUSING GENIE
 ######  Compiled by Ed Krimen
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 SUPPORT: WHERE TO FIND IT
 -------------------------
 -=> In the "Hardware" category (4)
 -=> from the "Straight FAX! and Joppa FAX/Modems!" topic (24)
 
 Message 93        Sun Dec 06, 1992
 C.S.SMETON [Charles S.]      at 21:37 EST
 
 The price of FAX Modems changes very frequently due to the rapidly
 changing marketplace.  Atari users have benefitted from the fact that
 there is a lot of competition from many modem vendors; this results in
 lower prices and a quicker pace of technological advancement.  The
 result is that it is possible to buy a 14,400 bps V.32bis FAX/Data Modem
 for less than the price of a 9600 bps data-only modem was just a year
 ago.
 
 Many users feel that they have been ripped off or are now stuck with
 obsolete equipment when this happens.  Unfortunately, this is the way
 the computer world operates.  There is little anyone in the Atari market
 can do to change this.  There are several things an consumer can do to
 minimize being "stuck" with a product that is about to become obsolete
 or have its invested value be sharply reduced.
 
 1.  Stay informed.  GEnie and the other online services and BBS networks
     are a good place to start.  I am sure other GEnie users can point
     you in the proper direction.
 
 2.  Read the various magazines (print and on-line) and stay aware of the
     changing marketplace, product reviews, product announcements, and
     ads.  I would suggest reading non-Atari specific magazines such as
     Byte or Computer Shopper, as they keep up on the trends for non-
     platform specific items such as printers, modems, disk drives,
     memory, monitors, etc.
 
 3.  Join a user group if one is available in your area.
 
 4.  Call the manufacturers of products and request information.  For
     instance, all GEnie subscribers receive the GEnie magazine in the
     mail.  Supra has been running ads for several months that have
     stated that their modems will be upgradable to support new features
     such as Caller ID, Silent Answer and Voice Mail.  The first two are
     now available options. This is one way to avoid buying an obsolete
     product, i.e. buy one that advertizes upgradability. This is the
     primary theme that Intel has been advertizing with their "Vacancy
     Inside" ads that indicate that a PC can be upgraded with their new
     clock doubler processors.
 
 Joppa Software Development
 ========================================
 
 
 REPAIRS: WHERE TO GET 'EM
 -------------------------
 -=> In the "Atari Corporation Online" category (14)
 -=> from the "Mega STE" topic (14)
 
 Message 115       Fri Dec 04, 1992
 J.PIERCE5 [Rob]              at 22:36 EST
 
 Now we have another problem, though.  As I've been posting in the Atari
 Service topic, I can find NO authorized service center that will service
 the machine under warranty.  They say that Atari has stopped reimbursing
 them for repairs, so they no longer do warranty service.  So I'm
 screwed.
 
 Rob
 ----------
 Message 119       Sun Dec 06, 1992
 M.DRYSDALE [Drys]            at 07:18 EST
 
 Rob, I have not tried this......I'm not sure it will work.....
 
 Send your dysfuncional ST to either Sheldon (Computer Studio) Winick (I
 just volunteered you) or to me (I volunteered too).  We can try to send
 it back to Atari for warranty exchange.  All you'll be out is the
 shipping and the machine for several weeks.
 
 OR
 
 You might send E-Mail to BOB-BRODIE (yet another volunteer)
 describing _in detail_ your problem and politely requesting a warranty
 exchange direct to Atari or through a dealer.
 
 Important info Atari will need at some point:  Serial number, sales
 receipt (charge card is best) for proof of purchase date, any shipping
 addresses on the original box, and all accessories.
 
 Mike, TEAM COMPUTERS now POWER Computers
 ========================================
 
 
 JUST WHAT -IS- THE KODAK PHOTO CD SYSTEM?
 -----------------------------------------
 -=> In the "Graphics" category (7)
 -=> from the "Kodak Photo CD Access System" topic (9)
 
 Message 86        Sat Dec 05, 1992
 EXPLORER.5 [Robert Goff]     at 17:21 EST
 
 Forgive me if this question has been asked before, but I'm confused.
 
 Just what _is_ the Kodak Photo CD system?  Do you have to buy hardware
 or software, or just the CD?
 
 How do the photos get on the CD? Do you have to buy a special camera and
 hook it to a special CD deck?
 
 How do you display the photos? Can a regular CD deck hook up to a
 television, or do you have to buy some more hardware?
 
 Thanks for any light you can shed.
 ----------
 Message 88        Sat Dec 05, 1992
 EXPLORER.1 [ Ron ]           at 23:33 EST
 
 Bob, Stop by most any camera store to see PhotoCD.  Quality and
 resolution is excellent, even in 256 color VGA.
 
 The process involves taking your negatives to your film processor and
 asking to have them transfered to PhotoCD (about $15 for 24 photos).  A
 few days later, you get a CD back with your digitized photographs.  The
 CD can then be played on a video disk player capable of displaying
 PhotoCD format.  Consumer players list in the $500 range but I have
 already seen them advertised for under $350.
 ----------
 Message 90        Sun Dec 06, 1992
 GREG                         at 00:52 EST
 
 EXPLORER.5 (Bob): Photo CD is a storage system for negatives or slides
 that are scanned by Kodak onto a CD-ROM disc.  You can take either an
 undeveloped roll of film, loose negatives or slides into any of several
 thousand locations across the country and get them scanned onto a CD-ROM
 disc.  Best Buy and a lot of corner drug stores are also doing the
 scanning now through Kodalux.
 
 After creating the disc, Photo CD can be many things:
 
 1. The disc can be "played" on any Kodak CD rom player using your home
    television for viewing.
 
 2. The disc can be put into any CD-I player and viewed.
 
 3. The disc can be put into an XA-capable CD -ROM player connected to a
    home computer or workstation.
 
 With options 1 and 2, the software for viewing is already in the machine
 or on the disc.
 
 With option 3, you will need software to access the data on the disc and
 convert it to a form viewable on your system.  Software is currently
 available for the Mac and PC Windows environment.  Software will be
 released in the coming months for viewing and editing on the Falcon.
 The photos can also be viewed on the ST and STe, but suffer from the
 color and pixel resolutions of the machines (See FOUNTAIN.LZH in the
 libraries here).  The graphics are still impressive.
 
 If you would like to see what true color looks like using the Photo CD
 process, the new Hot Stuff II CD by Screen Artists has examples of Photo
 CD converted to 16 million color Targa format.  Even at 512 by 768 pixel
 resolution, the Targa or TIF files are still over 1 meg in size, and
 this is still only one-fourth of the available resolution.
 
 If there's interest in a download this size, we can upload an example to
 the libraries here.
 
 A Photo-CD disc can travel across platforms as it uses what is called
 the 9660 standard for file storage.  In fact, there is a series of stock
 photos being released on a "rights-free" use basis that will include
 software for viewing on Photo-CD, CD-I, Mac, Windows 3.1, and Multimedia
 Windows right on the disc.  Atari support for this series in also being
 planned, but was held up due to lack of development hardware and a
 license snag.
 
 The BIG advantage of Photo CD is that your picture data is stored in a
 format better than most systems can currently use.  In other words, the
 next generation of computers will be catching up with Photo CD
 technology rather than passing it up.  The photos are stored at 3072 by
 2048 pixels in 16 million colors.  The actual uncompressed file size is
 over 18 megs per picture.  Your software only chews enough off the disc
 to match the capabilities of your system.
 
 I hope this made Photo CD a little clearer for you.
 ----------
 Message 92        Sun Dec 06, 1992
 POTECHIN [Nathan @ DMC]      at 14:21 EST
 
 Atari already has working software for the Kodak Photo CD technology.
 It is done and working and beautiful! ;-) It was shown at Comdex on a
 couple of Falcons AND on a TT.
 
 Greg, before you send Atari people off to view a Mac solution ;-), you
 need to see Calamus SL, using a 24 bit color card, on a decent monitor
 of your choice.  The Kodak Photo CD import driver works beautifully!  By
 the way, if you have Calamus SL, I have a brand new beta driver for the
 HP550C you might want to check out.
 ========================================
 
 
 "YOU'RE A REAL COMPUTER GENIUS, RIGHT?"
 ---------------------------------------
 (Jerry Pournelle RT)
 -=> In the "Computer Science" category (4)
 -=> from the "Atari TT030" topic (15)
 
 Message 109       Thu Dec 03, 1992
 C.WORTON                     at 22:53 EST
 
 Had an interesting phone call the other day.  "Charlie, you're a whiz at
 computers, right?"
 
 "Well, I know some.  What did you need?"
 
 "Here, talk to my friend."  (Friend comes on line.)
 
 "Hi, Charlie!  You're a real computer genius, right?"
 
 "Not really.  What did you need?"
 
 "Well, I just bought this computer, and I need to get into it."
 
 "What do you mean, 'get into' it?"
 
 "You know... make it 'do' something."
 
 (sigh) "What brand of machine is it?"
 
 "Uh... just a moment... oh, here.  It's a Samsung."
 
 "Are you reading that off the monitor casing?"
 
 "Yes."
 
 "What's the label on the computer casing?"
 
 "Ummm.... Hyundai."
 
 "Okay.  What you have is a generic computer that runs an operating
 system called DOS.  In order to use DOS, you need to know the
 abbreviations of the commands.  You also need to know the correct order
 of input; if you mistype the command, or type the command correctly, but
 put it in the wrong place, you will receive an error response.  I do not
 know the DOS commands; I tend to work with computers that use a
 graphical user interface, such as Atari, Amiga, or Macintosh."
 
 "Well, I don't want one of those toy computers.  I want a real one."
 
 (sigh) "What programs came with the computer?"
 
 "I don't know."
 
 "You don't KNOW?  Didn't your salesman tell you?"
 
 "Well, I bought it at a pawnshop."
 
 "You bought it at a... Listen, how much did you pay for this?"
 
 "Hey, I got a really good deal.  Only a thousand, for everything."
 
 "Okay.  I can't help you.  Call the people at Softwarehouse; perhaps
 they'll guide you through it over the phone."
 
 "I already called them.  They said to bring it down, and they'd set it
 up for $65."
 
 "Do it.  Pay it.  Get their opinion on the deal you made.  Let them show
 you other machines in a similar price range.  They also sell Macs; look
 at a Mac."
 
 "Okay.  Do you think I got a good deal?"
 
 "I don't know what microprocessor you got, I don't know what graphics
 card you got, I don't know what monitor you got, I don't even know if
 your hard disk is functional.  But considering what you paid, and where
 you purchased it, I think you spent roughly a thousand more then you
 should have.  There's a REASON it was in a pawnshop.  And while you're
 thinking about that, think about what you want to use a computer FOR.
 To this point, you haven't been able to achieve anything with the
 machine, have you?"
 
 "Well, no."
 
 "DOS was designed to be used by data processing professionals.  It was
 never intended to be used by the general public, who often express
 difficulty in running their microwave or programming their VCR.  I would
 suggest you go down to Softwarehouse, let the salesperson show you some
 of the things that computers can do, and the two of you arrive at a
 decision as to what you want to purchase.  Then, purchase it.  Do NOT
 purchase a machine on the basis of its looks; buy it for what it can do
 for you."
 
 "What kind do you use?"
 
 "I own an Atari ST.  The Atari is, with the Amiga, one of the finest
 machines on the planet.  Unfortunately, there are no longer any dealers
 for the machines in this city.  Until that changes, it's pretty hard for
 me to recommend them to someone who will need guidance.  I would suggest
 that you consider either the Macintosh line of computers, or a 486/33
 DOS box running Windows 3.1.  And I would further suggest that you deal
 with a computer professional, not with a discount dealer.  A
 professional can save you more then he or she will cost you."
 
 There was more, but you get the drift.  I cannot fathom why people
 purchase a machine that they cannot use, but they do... in droves.  I
 think I need some psychologist to explain it to me.  It can't be just
 marketing; it has to be some deep seated desire to be frustrated that is
 operating here.
 
 Regards,
 Charlie
 ----------
 Category 4,  Topic 15
 Message 112       Fri Dec 04, 1992
 SLP                          at 19:49 EST
 
 Charlie, my favorite story about the PC was told to me by an Atari
 dealer (when there used to be one in town).  He also sold software for
 the C-64, Amiga, Apple, and IBM.
 
 Anyway, one evening a frantic customer called him up and told him that
 his (DOS) computer was broken.  All he could get on the screen was a
 letter C and a greater than sign.
 
 This guy had been using the computer for 2 years and had never even seen
 a DOS prompt.  Apparently whoever sold him the computer had installed a
 menu system that allowed him to pick which program he wanted to run.  I
 have the feeling that thousands of users are the same way.
 
 Scott
 ========================================
 
 
 ######  OPEN LETTER TO ATARI USERS
 ######  By Nathan Potechin
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 An Open Letter to Atari Users
 Regarding the STReport Editorial about Comdex 92
 
 Nathan Potechin,
 DMC Publishing,
 Toronto, Canada.
 Dec. 1, 1992.
 
 Dear Atari Users:
 
 I received a telephone call today from Mr. Mariano.  He and his staff
 have made it clear that they will not discuss last week's STreport
 editorial "From the Editor's Desk" "Saying it like it is!" in Category
 18.  As most of you are aware, Category 18 was set up specifically to
 discuss Rumours, Flames and controversial issues.  Since I felt that
 last week's Editorial was controversial - indeed, disgraceful and
 personally repugnant - I started a new topic in order to have a place
 for us to attempt to discern reality from the smoke and mirrors for
 which STReport is justly infamous.
 
 Sadly, Mr. Mariano and staff have chosen to refuse to respond.  Senior
 Editor Lloyd Pulley even went so far as to say they they would only
 respond to "the public" implying that I don't count, that I have nothing
 to contribute and that I have nothing to say.  Well, I have a thing or
 two to say alright and I thank you in advance for listening.
 
 It is a rare occasion when anyone dares confront the STReport
 juggernaut.  Most of us simply do not have the hours in the day.  As a
 result, they get away with far too much of what I'd consider
 inappropriate behaviour.  When someone such as myself (let's use myself
 as an example) ;-) dares respond to anything in STReport that might be
 considered CRITICISM, I get attacked, my credibility gets attacked, my
 judgment gets attacked, my impartiality gets attacked, my wife gets
 attacked, the Atari RT's on GEnie get attacked, of course Atari gets
 attacked in passing (STReport never misses an opportunity as we all
 know) :-) my friends get attacked and everyone else associated with me
 gets attacked - especially if they dare to speak out as well.
 
 All that is a given.  In spite of that, a few brave souls manage to
 offer a CONCRETE FACT every now and then, a small glimmer of the TRUTH
 sparkles briefly and then, just sometimes, some JUSTICE prevails.  I'd
 like to believe that bringing that small particle of TRUTH to light
 makes all this worthwhile.
 
 Since Mr. Mariano has refused to post in Category 18 (not that he is
 posting much in Category 24 either) and Lloyd, as predictable as
 gravity, is doing everything BUT address the issue, please allow me the
 opportunity to discuss last week's editorial and explain EXACTLY why I
 took umbrage with it.  I wish to remove any possibility of confusion
 once and for all.
 
 Remember, this is a response to STReport.  I am replying to last weeks
 editorial, much of which specifically contradicted posts that I publicly
 made in the BB during Comdex.
 
 In his editorial Mr. Mariano said:
 
 Here we are a week or so after Comdex and what do we find going on?
 People are still discussing the pros and cons of Atari's performance at
 Comdex.  Odd... don't you think?  When all one need do is use one's
 eyes.  After all, seeing is believing.  There is strange word, (believe)
 right in the middle of the word is a (lie)!  More smoke and mirrors?
 Maybe.
 
 And I respond, just as if he had posted in the Bulletin Board rather
 than from the comfort of his STReport bastion:
 
 I was there.  I used my eyes.  I posted what I saw.
 
 Am I to conclude that Mr. Mariano was calling me a liar?  Doubtful.  I
 believe instead that Mr. Mariano was portraying Atari in the worst
 possible light as has been the policy of STReport for years already,
 regardless of the FACTS.  The play on the word LIE was juvenile.
 
 Mr. Mariano continued:
 
 Atari's performance at Comdex is indicative  of the times.  They've
 managed to disappoint the users and dealers every year since 1987 in
 regards to big Christmas Sales seasons.  Yet we see no-one trying to
 make excuses for this obvious marketing blunder.
 
 And I respond:
 
 No way I defend the past performance of Atari Corp. in terms of
 Marketing or Advertising in North America these past few years.  They
 have, sadly, not made it easy to be an Atari Dealer or an Atari
 Developer.
 
 Mr. Mariano went on to say:
 
 Then why, in retrospect, do we find really decent people in the Atari
 platform try like crazy to "explain away" the rather sedate 'action' at
 Atari's booth this year?
 
 And I respond:
 
 I can only assume that I am one of the people to which Mr. Mariano
 refers.  The "sedate action" in the Atari booth actually had very little
 to do with Atari themselves.  No one tried "like crazy" to explain away
 anything.
 
 I did make some FACTS known in my posts based on my own experience at
 Comdex these past years.  I will share them with you again:
 
 The Interface Group are the Show Organizers for Comdex.  Coincidently,
 they also OWN the Sands Expo Center.  They built it.  It was clearly
 their intention to establish a rival to the main Las Vegas Convention
 Center.  This is the third year it has been in operation.  After this
 year it became obvious that they had, to date, FAILED in their
 endeavour.
 
 The first year, Atari had a great booth in a great location but there
 were really no big names or big draws present, besides themselves :-)
 The second year there were a few more NAMES and DRAWS but still the
 traffic in this hall remained light.  Remember, this was not supposed to
 be a satellite hall but a second main hall.  It is rather large and I
 was told by one of the Interface Group representitives that they are
 adding on to it.
 
 This third year in operation they convinced a great many name brand
 companies of worldwide reknown to exhibit in the Sands.  I have
 mentioned a few names in other posts here.  I'll type in a complete list
 if someone wants to read a who's who.  The point is, the traffic should
 have been there this year.  It was not!  Based on the best information
 available to Atari last year, when they had to book the space, this year
 should have seen serious action in the Sands to rival the LVCC.  Again
 it did not.
 
 So Atari made the decision last week to exhibit in the main hall next
 year.  They have given up their large prime location and gone for the
 guaranteed action instead of the potential action.  I am personally and
 professionally pleased with that decision.  I wish hindsight could have
 worked a year ago.  Welcome to real life. :-)  The Interface Group has a
 very real problem on their hands now.  They have a great many upset
 exhibitors.  When the LVCC sees upwards of 135,000 people and about
 20,000 come through the Sands the entire week, (or some such nonsense)
 you have to know there is a problem. :-)  In my opinion, there simply
 aren't enough hours in the entire week for a potential attendee to cover
 it all so they tend to concentrate their time in the LVCC and that's
 that!  No smoke, no mirrors, just some FACTS.
 
 But Mr. Mariano plowed onwards, digging himself a hole:
 
 Granted there may have been a few thousand flyers and brochures handed
 out, but in the busiest of years this was never looked upon as a solid
 'rule of thumb' when gauging booth attendance.  Why all of a sudden do
 we see all sorts of reaching going on to justify the quiet booth.
 
 And I respond:
 
 I publicly posted, in the Comdex topic set up specifically for that
 purpose, that to my delight, we went through all the brochures we had
 brought to Comdex.  This was a first for us.  I usually have to ship
 some back or better yet, pass them along to a Dealer that can use them
 in a mailout or handout to potential customers.  I also understood that
 Atari used up all of their Atari Falcon 030 brochures as well.
 
 Speaking for DMC and Calamus SL, I remind Mr. Mariano that the booth was
 not as busy as we would have liked. :-) Since he has  pointed this out
 so adamantly, I wonder why it never occured to him that this meant that
 we had the opportunity to spend one-on-one quality time with those that
 did make it over to the Sands.  That is exactly what we did.
 
 Seeing the Kodak Photo CD import driver working in Calamus SL, using the
 24 bit Cybercube Cyrel card to display on the 21" hi-res Mitsubishi
 monitor is very impressive indeed.  We had good, solid questions from
 serious and interested people that were not aware that Atari had
 anything of this calibre.  (Where have we heard this before.) :-) In
 other words, DMC took full advantage of every bit of traffic that came
 into the Sands and through the booth and as usual - we opened some eyes!
 
 I made NO attempt to justify the action in the booth except to make it
 clear that the light traffic was prevalent throughout the Sands.  I did
 point out that we went through all those brochures, in fact running out
 on Thursday, and that they went to people that took the time to look and
 appreciate what they saw.  So, in this particular case, the brochures
 were indeed an excellent gauge of the action in the booth.
 
 Mr. Mariano went on, digging deeper and deeper:
 
 Biggest question of all, why are there people ever so busy trying to
 tell the userbase that what was seen was _not_ really what they saw?
 Sound ridiculous?  Sure it does but that's exactly what is going on!
 
 And I respond:
 
 I beg your pardon?  I, for one, told the userbase, my friends, my
 customers and my associates, exactly what I saw.  You were not in
 attendance Mr. Mariano.  With all due respect, and I mean that
 sincerely, :-), the above paragraph is absolute nonsense!
 
 Then Mr. Mariano threw out some more dirt:
 
 Of course, there will always be the buck passing... since 1987, its
 never been Atari's fault or the fault of the decision makers at Atari
 for the dregs they've placed themselves in...  This year we are being
 told it was the Interface Group's fault (they organize and manage
 Comdex).  In particular, the dismal performance at the Atari booth is
 being blamed on the manner in which the Sands expo center was managed.
 Right...  why is it through the years, its _never_ been acknowledged it
 could've been the fault of poor management decisions etc..
 
 Take a few of the glaring incidents in the past for example.. The
 Federated Fiasco, Federated's fault - The ATW failure, "not our design"
 etc.. - Upgraded Portfolio design, not our design etc..- Notebook, Pen
 and Stacy...  all accounting for huge sums of money gone south.  Yet
 none of these things or incidents have ever been attributed to or even
 hinted at being the responsibility of Atari or its management or lack of
 it.
 
 Nope, in the broadest of terms everybody and his brother has been blamed
 but never once was the real responsibility ever fixed where it really
 belongs.
 
 And I respond:
 
 I have already addressed the facts surrounding the Sands Expo Center.
 They are clear and obvious.  Atari is certainly responsible for not
 being called Microsoft.  I cannot argue that at all.  Yup, you're right.
 If they would have only been named Microsoft, they could have exhibited
 in Reno and still gotten the traffic.  The point is, they made mistakes.
 I do not defend them.  They did make mistakes.  That's a fact.  I've
 made them too.  I hope I learned from mine. :-) Now can we get on with
 our lives?
 
 And Mr. Mariano finally concluded from his hole deep in the ground:
 
 Now we are told that "Jack is back".  To that I say I've been told that
 a number of times in the past and still....  no real improvement.  A
 typical strong example of strange executive reaction was the statement
 made by Sam Tramiel about the Forbes Article.  A laugh?  A joke?  It was
 sad to see that article hit, even for me.  Atari has always had a
 dynamite machine design but alas, its management team well..  that's
 another story.  Now that Comdex is behind us, let's see how long it
 takes for the damage control smoothies to get started in trying to
 convince all of us that what we saw really wasn't what we saw at all.
 
 Ralph @ STReport International Online Magazine
 
 
 And I responded one last time:
 
 Mr. Mariano, Jack is BACK!  That's a fact.  Atari has always had
 dynamite machines and that's the truth too.  Sam is President.  Garry
 runs North America and seems quite capable.  Leonard is currently
 betwixt and between but certain to appear in some challenging role in
 the near future.  A new head of TOS has been appointed in Sunnyvale and
 one of these days, if we are real lucky, the Falcon will actually appear
 on these shores.  Isn't life grand. :-)
 
 As a "struggling" Atari Developer, not supported by mail order sales
 based on free advertising in an online magazine, I have earned the right
 to be as pessimistic or as optimistic as I choose.  I choose to be an
 optimist because I love my Atari running Calamus SL and I'll stack it up
 against anything!!
 
 Sincerely
 Nathan Potechin
 President of DMC Publishing, Inc.
 Member of the Independant Association of Atari Developers
 
 ps; I held this letter, waiting to see what would happen in the next
 STReport because Lou Rocha dared post publicly in Cat 24 accusing
 STReport of much of what you read above.  Typically and predictably, Mr.
 Mariano did not post at all while Lloyd did his absolute best smoke and
 mirror act on Lou and then both Ralph and Lloyd attacked Lou in this
 weeks issue of STReport.  This nonsense must stop.  This is a travesty
 and I, for one, have had enough.
 
 =======================================================================
 (C) 1992 by Atari Corporation, GEnie, and the Atari Roundtables.  May be
 reprinted only with this notice intact.  The Atari Roundtables on GEnie
 are *official* information services of Atari Corporation.  To sign up
 for GEnie service, call (with modem) 800-638-8369.  Upon connection type
 HHH (RETURN after that).  Wait for the U#= prompt.  Type XTX99437,GEnie
 and hit RETURN.  The system will prompt you for your information.
 =======================================================================
 
 
 ###### THE Z*NET COMPUTER CALENDAR 1992-1993
 ###### Schedule of Shows, Events and Online Conferences
 ###### ----------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 ### December 20, 1992
 Eugene, Oregon.  Atari SWAP MEET planned at the GATEWAY MALL MEETING
 PLACE.  The hours have not been finalized yet but tentively they will be
 10am - 5pm.  There may be a small admission fee this year (no more than
 $1.00) and there may be a table fee.
 
 
 ### December 24-25, 1992
 Christmas 1992!  Spend time with your loved ones!  Hope you bought an
 Atari product for your favorite person!
 
 
 ### December 31/January 1,1993
 New Years Eve, New Years Day!  Happy New Year!  Make those resolutions
 stick this time around!
 
 
 ### January 6-9, 1993
 MacWorld Expo in San Fransisco California, Sponsored by MacWorld
 Magazine.  Titled San Fransisco '93 at the Moscone Center.


 ### January 12-14, 1993
 Networld '93 in Boston, Massachusettes

 
 ### January 7-10, 1993
 The Winter Consumer Electronics Show comes to Las Vegas, Nevada.  CES is
 an electronic playground, with everything in the way of high tech toys
 for kids and adults.  Game consoles and hand-held entertainment items
 like the Atari Lynx are big here, and Atari will attend with a hotel
 suite showroom.  Contact Atari Corp for more information on seeing their
 display at 408-745-2000.
 
 
 ### January 15-18, 1993
 NAMM is the largest conclave of musicians each year.  Held in Los
 Angeles at the Anaheim Convention Center, the variety of sights at the
 National Association of Music Merchandisers is wilder than at
 Disneyland, just next door.  Atari was the first computer manufacturer
 to ever display at NAMM in 1987, and has become a standard at the shows.
 A trade show for music stores, distributors, and professionals of every
 strata, entertainers are seen everywhere at NAMM.  Contact James Grunke
 at Atari Corp for more information at 408-745-2000.


 ### February 2-4, 1993
 ComNet '93 in Washington, DC.
 
 
 ### March 1993
 CeBIT, the world's largest computer show with 5,000 exhibitors in 20
 halls, is held annually in Hannover, Germany.  Atari traditionally
 struts its newest wares there, usually before it's seen in the USA or
 anywhere else.  In '93, the Atari 040 machines should be premiering, and
 this is the likely venue.  Third party developers also use this show to
 introduce new hardware and software, so expect a wave of news from CeBIT
 every year.  Atari Corp and the IAAD coordinate cross-oceanic contacts
 to promote worldwide marketing of Atari products, and this show is an
 annual touchstone of that effort.  Contact Bill Rehbock at Atari Corp
 for information at 408-745-2000.
 
 
 ### March 13-14, 1993
 The Sacramento Atari Computer Exposition is to be sponsored by the
 Sacramento Atari ST Users Group (SST) at the Towe Ford Museum in
 Sacramento, California.  This show replaces the earlier scheduled, then
 cancelled Northern California Atari Fest for the Bay Area, to have been
 held in December 1992.  A major two day effort, the SAC show is being
 held in the special events area of the Towe Ford Museum, home of the
 worlds most complete antique Ford automobile collection.  As an added
 bonus, admission to the museum is free when you attend the Expo.  The
 museum is located at the intersection of Interstates 5 and 80, just 15
 minutes from the Sacramento Metropolitan Airport.  Contact Nick Langdon
 (Vendor Coordinator) C/O SST, P.O. Box 214892, Sacramento, CA 95821-
 0892, phone 916-723-6425, GEnie: M.WARNER8, ST-Keep BBS (SST) 916-729-
 2968.


 ### March 21-24, 1993
 Interop Spring '93 in Washington DC.
 
 
 ### August 3-6, 1993
 MacWorld Expo at the Boston World Trade Center, Bayside Exposition
 Center and sponsored by MacWorld Magazine.  This event is titled Boston
 '93.
 
 
 ### September 18-19, 1993
 The Glendale Show returns with the Southern California Atari Computer
 Faire, V.7.0, in suburban Los Angeles, California.  This has been the
 year's largest domestic Atari event, year after year.  Contact John King
 Tarpinian at the user group HACKS at 818-246-7286 for information.
 
 
 ### September 20-22, 1993
 The third MacWorld Expo, titled Canada '93 at the Metro Toronto
 Convention Centre, sponsored by MacWorld Magazine.


 ### September 21-23, 1993
 Unix Expo '93 in New York City, New York.


 If you have an event you would like to include on the Z*Net Calender,
 please send email vai GEnie to Z-NET, CompuServe 75300,1642, or via
 FNET to node 593 or AtariNet node 51:1/13.0
 
 

 ######  THE UNABASHED ATARIOPHILE
 ######  By Michael R. Burkley
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 Some people collect sports cards, others coins, old tools, cars,
 animals, you name it someone probably collects it.  What do I collect?
 I collect ST's!  I have five ST's (including one four Meg STe) which are
 distributed among my family, myself, and my church.  I also have five
 single-sided drives, four double-sided drives, one 44 Meg SyQuest
 cartridge drive (It's WONDERFUL), three color monitors (not counting the
 broken one in the attic), an Ominmon Rainbow multisync monitor, and one
 monochrome monitor.  Oh yes, I also have a modem, a DVT video tape Hard
 Drive backup system, a zillion floppies scattered all over my computer
 room, and an understanding wife (and while I don't own her she's the
 best of all!).
 
 What do I do with all of that equipment?  I use it, each and every bit
 of it (though sometimes not often enough, but the story of my trashed
 hard drive will have to wait until another time, perhaps next week).  I
 use my ST's to learn about the world, to have a lot of fun, to do _A
 LOT_ of work, to meet many people, and to make new friends.

 One of those people I've met through my ST is David Becker.  David is
 one of those amazing people who have all sorts of creative ideas AND the
 skills and perseverance needed to bring those ideas to fruition.  I've
 seen at least thirty of his programs and files and I've been constantly
 amazed and the quality, the originality, and the usefulness of them all.
 He brings a certain zest to his programming that carries over to the
 users of his programs.  He makes them easy and fun to use.
 
 CONNECT is Connections v. 1.0 by David Becker.  Linking text, graphics,
 ------- animation and sound within interactive multimedia presentations
 is not a new idea. Hypercard on the Macintosh has been doing it for
 years.  Many commercial programs exist for the PC as well.  It's been
 around in some form or another for the ST for quite some time as well.
 TCOS by Matthew P. Aubury and HyperScreen by R.J. Pearson both allow
 text and graphics to be combined in a linked environment.  HyperLink by
 JMG Software is a much more intensive and capable commercial database
 that allows you to mix text, graphics, animations, and data all in one
 seamless database.  Now David has created his own interactive multi-
 media presentation software that allows you to easily create your own
 "families" of information that link graphics, text files, sounds, and
 animation.  He has designed it so you can pass on your information in an
 interactive, informative, educational, entertaining, and fun way.  He
 provides you with all the tools you need to create your own multimedia
 masterpiece.  I really like this program, and recommend it to you
 highly.  Detailed docs and tutorial included.  It requires at least one
 Meg of RAM, a monochrome monitor (or a color monitor with a mono
 emulator--see below), and a hard drive.
 
 TREK_FAM is a Star Trek multimedia presentation by David Becker for use
 -------- with his Connections program.  This detailed family contains
 much detailed information on both the original and the Next Generation
 Star Trek series:  A Star Trek time-line based on official sources
 (beginning c. 2 million years ago), a descriptive listing with titles
 and dates for each episode in both series, and pictures of most of the
 major characters are included.  Digitized sounds and two animations of
 the new Enterprise in Warp and under Impulse power are also available.
 Do you know who the actor behind the voice of the computer is?  The same
 person who played "Nurse Chapel" in the original series, Majel Barrett!
 There's lots more where that came from!
 
 SITKA_1 is another "Creation Family" by Wally for use with Connections.
 ------- This one takes you on a brief excursion through Sitka, AK, and
 some of the activities and scenery available around there.  You even get
 to see what Wally looks like!  This family includes text and graphics,
 but no sound files.

 ZOOPHONE is "Let's Phone the Zoo" by David Becker. This interactive
 -------- storybook for kids is another neat Connections family.  It
 presents a short story about a little girl phoning the animals at the
 zoo.  Kids (or adults!) can click on words and sentences and discover
 digitized sounds, animations and graphics.  It's fun!

 MISSING is another Connection family that is not so much fun to use.
 ------- David has created this listing of missing children throughout
 the United States and Canada.  It presents you with forty unsolved
 cases.  Photos of the children (and some of the abductors) are show
 right on-screen, with some of the children's pictures having been age-
 enhanced.  A scrollable text file explains each case.  This fully
 interactive presentation shows you maps, contacts and much more in a
 point and click environment.  Thank you David for caring enough to do
 something like this!

 What else has he done with his "free time?"  LOTS...

 dbWRITER v.1.8 is his excellent and very full-featured word processing
 -------------- program for your mono ST.  It uses a fast custom graphic
 user interface that closely resembles GEM.  It will run on any ST (while
 it works with a .5 meg machine it works best with one meg of RAM or
 more).  It includes a clipboard that allows multiple entries!  Keyboard
 and mouse controlled.  It allows you to import various commercial
 wordprocessing files automatically!  This program and its accompanying
 dictionary file (DBW_DICT, and DBWACC) and Thesaurus are well worth
 getting!  It's amazing that something like this is free!  If you have a
 mono monitor, I recommend this.  Docs included.
 
 DBWACC is the dbWRITER Dictionary and Thesaurus Desk Accessory (or .PRG)
 ------ v.1.0 by David Becker.  This .ACC will allow you to:  * Search
 the 40,000 word dbWRITER dictionary from within any GEM application.
 * Access the dbWRITER 30,000 word thesaurus from within any GEM program.
 * Many different search and seek options including a recursive thesaurus
 * Scroll through the dictionary page by page.
 * Print out text from the dictionary or the thesaurus.
 * Load and use custom supplemental dictionaries.  It contains a built-in
 help function and written docs.  Mono only, Hard disk required.  Use
 with version 1.8 of his dbWRITER word processor.
 
 DBWSUPP is a set of supplemental dictionary files for use with the
 ------- dbWRITER .ACC/.PRG (see DBWACC).  It also contains the utility
 needed to create your own supplemental dictionaries (plus docs).
 Included in this archive are the following dictionaries:  
    MEDICAL     medical dictionary 
    PHARMACAL   pharmaceutical dictionary 
    LEGAL       legal dictionary  
    BIBLICAL    biblical words and names 
    COMPUTER    names,terms and words used in the computing field 
    NAMES       all sorts of different names, boys and girls 
    MATH        mathematical dictionary 
 You can add to these using your favorite word processor.  Mono only.

 DBWTHESS is the Thesaurus files for use with the dbWRITER dictionary and
 -------- Thesaurus .ACC/.PRG (see DBWACC) and dbWRITER v.1.8 and above
 (see DBWRTR18) and text processor (version 1.8 of the text processor and
 up).  Having a Thesaurus is great (do you know that the word "Thesaurus"
 is a Greek word meaning "Treasure"?  Words _are_ a treasure to use
 wisely!).
 
 SEARCHME is Search Me, a puzzle generator that creates word searches
 -------- just like the ones in the newspaper!  You can use the dbWRITER
 dictionary (see this above), the dictionary included in this file (a
 very down-sized version of the dbWriter dictionary), your own custom
 dictionary, or your own list of words. You can save and load puzzles to
 disk, print them out, save them as DEGAS pictures or play them right on
 the ST! You will need a monochrome monitor.   Word length can be from 2
 to 15 letters with up to 50 words per puzzle allowed. GEM based, this
 program is very easy to use.  Docs included.

 COYOTE is Coyote Dave's Poker v.1.0.  It's a great game.  Sit down with
 ------ this program and you'll find yourself grabbing a chair, choosing
 a table in the saloon and sitting down for some five card draw poker.
 You'll have a chance to play against some of the most treacherous,
 conniving and smoothest characters north of the Rio Grande!  I'm not
 talking about two dimensional computer simulations!  These are real
 folks, just like your irritating neighbor across the street.  So pour
 yourself a drink (watch it though!), relax and let's separate the real
 poker players from the cattle rustlers!  Mono only.  Excellent sound,
 excellent poker playing, and all sorts of fun (like when you're losing,
 buy the other players some drinks and see what happens!).  Detailed docs
 included.  Online helps.  Recommended.
 
 Those are some of David Becker's most recent programs, but as I've said,
 he's done dozens more.  You can find them all on GEnie, but I've seen
 them on information services and BBS's everywhere I've been.
 
 BGAMMON is Online Backgammon by David Becker.  Online Backgammon
 ------- attempts to fill a void within the ST domain. First the lack of
 monochrome specific leisure software. Second a lack of games that can be
 played head to head online through the modem and last a shortage of
 freeware backgammon games period!  It assumes you know how to play
 backgammon, and adheres to the games rules with only one exception (for
 you to find out!)  You can either play against a friend on line or
 against the computer.  Mono only.  You must supply the modem!  Docs
 included.  For any ST, STe.

 CALVIN is a mono only animation of Calvin from the cartoon "Calvin and
 ------ Hobbes."  Watch Calvin walk across your screen, at a speed
 controlled by you.

 CRISCROS is CrissCross by David Becker.  It is a hybrid of Gomuku, Go
 -------- and Othello.  You play against the computer on a 20x18 grid of
 360 squares.  You and the ST take turns putting down coloured markers
 and trying to get five in a row.  When one of you is successful in
 getting five diagonally, vertically or horizontally then you will score
 1 point and the five markers are removed from the grid.  The first
 player to get 10 points will win the game. You play black. This is
 another experiment with the ZeST alternative interface (that gives your
 ST a NeXT look).  For all ST's.  Mono only (well, it will run in color,
 but it's not as nice).  Docs included.
 
 DINGBAT by David Becker is a program that will allow you to include
 ------- those non-standard graphic characters that are hidden deep
 within your ST but which you cannot access from within the desktop. How
 about a little clock in your alarm accessory or a musical note in your
 MIDI program?  This program can do it for you!  Mono only.  Docs
 included.

 F11_23 is the function key template designer v.2.3 by David Becker.
 ------ Have you memorized all the key combinations and what they do for
 that new word processor?  How about the quick keyboard macros for that
 desktop publishing package?  Can you remember where you left your car
 keys?  This program can help (at least with the first two difficulties)!
 Design and print out templates that line up right alongside your ten
 function keys that give you all the reminders you need.  Color or mono.
 Docs included.
 
 FASTFIX is Fast Fix by David Becker.  It is a auto .PRG that turns off
 ------- that irritating keyclick and sets the ALT/HELP screen dump to
 960 pixels/ line so that screens print correctly.  Color or mono.

 FRUSTRAT is Frustration! It is a two player word search game.  Each
 -------- player, in turn, tries to create words from a random
 combination of letters spread over an 11 by 11 grid (that works out to
 121 letters).  Scoring is based on word length, the longer the word, the
 better your score.  Race against the clock and each other.  Mono only.
 Docs included.
 
 JIFFYDRW is Jiffy Draw, a many-feature, DEGAS-compatible mono drawing
 -------- and paint program by David Becker.  You can do lots of things
 with this program, especially some interesting manipulation of your
 finished drawings!  Docs included.

 JUMBLE is ABC Jumble.  This is an educational program for young children
 ------ in the 3-7 age group.  This simple program lets kids sort the
 letters of the alphabet after the computer jumbles them up.  Its GEM
 interface and point and click environment make it simple even for the
 littlest user.  Helps on-line, encouragements when you complete you
 unjumbling, and more.  Mono only (thanks David for producing so many
 mono programs, especially this one for kids!)  Docs included.
 
 MONMAGIC is Monitor Magic, an .ACC that will let you change your color
 -------- monitor into a green or amber monitor.  When you return to the
 normal colors the monitor no longer shows the green but a soothing blue.
 It will also allow you to reverse the display on your mono monitor.
 
 PAI_GOW is a computer poker game with a twist.  You are dealt 7 cards
 ------- from which you must choose a two card and a five card hand.  To
 win you must beat both of your opponent's hands.  Play against the
 computer or with a person via modem.  Mono only.  Docs included.
 
 POKERSQR is Poker Squared. If you like solitaire and you enjoy poker
 -------- then you're going to enjoy Poker Squared.  Runs on any ST with
 a mono monitor.  25 cards are dealt, one at a time into a square on the
 right side of the game board.  You must decide where to place each card
 on a grid of 25 squares.  Create the 10 best possible poker hands (you
 hope), five up and down, five side to side and two hands diagonally.
 This game uses the ZeST interface for the NeXT desktop look.  Docs
 included.
 
 SMARTDAT is SmartDate.  This little AUTO folder program will prompt you
 -------- to enter the day, month, and year when you hold down the
 Alternate or Control key when booting your ST.  It will write that info
 to a small file.  From then on, your ST will read that date on boot up.
 This way, you only need to set the date once each day in order for it to
 be correct.  Great for keeping track of things!   Docs included.  Mono
 only.
 
 ZESTCLOK is a stand-alone version of the ZeST digital clock found in
 -------- v.1.6 of David Becker's Zest Desktop.  Click on this when you
 want to turn your ST into a clock!  Mono only.  Interesting graphics and
 animation.
 
 ZESTKENO is ZeST Keno.  This little program will allow you to play
 -------- hundreds of Keno games really fast and let me test different
 combinations of numbers. This version of Keno uses his ZeST alternative
 interface and requires a monochrome monitor.  ZeST Keno is not a betting
 game as much as it is a tool for analyzing the game of Keno and the 
 outcomes using different combinations of numbers.  (I can tell you how
 it works out in the long run:  the house wins and you lose!).  Docs
 included.  Mono only.
 
 ZESTPOKR is ZeST Draw Poker.  He wrote this fun little program to show
 -------- off the ZeST Alternative Desktop (a NeXT look-a-like).  Deal,
 draw, bet, check your winnings (we won't talk about the other
 possibility-- probability?).  This game can even turn into a slot
 machine!  Docs included.  Mono only.
 
 ZEST16 is ZeST Desktop Applications v.1.6.  This program is an amazing
 ------ alternative interface for the ST!  It looks like the NeXT desktop
 with "sculpted" buttons and more.  ZeST16.PRG includes a paint program,
 calendar, typewriter and database in a desktop environment, and now, a
 corner digital clock AND the ability to run other programs right from
 the ZeST desktop!  Each program is fully functional, and useful!  This
 guy is amazing.  He keeps producing wonderful, Free programs.  Also
 included is the GFA3 source code so you can expand on this idea
 yourself!  Docs included.  Mono only.
 
 AUTOZEST is Auto ZeST v.1.1, a GFA Interface Creation Utility.  This
 -------- is a utility that completely automates the creation of ZeST
 screens, front ends, windows, buttons, boxes and sliders!  It's like a
 poor man's NextStep in GFA. AUTO ZeST will save authentic GFA code to
 disk that can then be merged right into the GFA editor.  ST/STe/MSTe
 compatible. Docs included.  Mono only.

 But have you noticed that all of David's programs only work with a
 monochrome monitor?  Are you stuck if you only have a color monitor?
 Not at all!  There are a number of excellent monochrome monitor
 emulators out there.  I'll only mention one today.

 SEBRA is "The High-Res Monochrome Monitor Emulator" by Patrik Persson
 ----- of Sweden.  This is simply the best monochrome emulator I have
 seen as of today.  It will work on any ST/STe/Mega with a color monitor
 or TV set!  It is fast, with lots of options to customize the speed,
 screen display, and more to your satisfaction.  The mouse moves SMOOTHLY
 about the screen.  With a few simple keystrokes you can set this program
 up to run just as you wish.  I recommend this highly.  It works with
 just about everything, too!  Read the docs to see all that he has done
 to optimize this program.  It's exciting! Freeware.
 
 Well, that's about all for now.  Next week I'm not sure if I'll tell you
 the story of how my hard drive almost led me down into the depths of
 dispair, or just show you how much material is being produced for the ST
 each week by just describing next week's downloads.  Either way I hope
 it will be interesting!
 
 
                                  # # #
           **--DELPHI SIGN-UP--**       **--GENIE SIGN-UP--**
        ============================|============================
        To sign up for  DELPHI call | To sign up for   GENIE call
        (with modem)  800-695-4002. | (with modem)  800-638-8369.
        Upon connection hit  return | Upon connection type HHH 
        once or twice. At Password: | and hit return.  Wait for
        type ZNET and hit . | the U#= prompt and type in
                                    | the following: XTX99436,
                                    | GEnie and hit return.
        ============================|============================
                        **--COMPUSERVE SIGN-UP--**
        To sign up for CompuServe service call (with phone) (800)
        848-8199. Ask for operator #198.  You will then be sent a
        $15.00 free  membership kit.
        =========================================================
                       **--ATARINET INFORMATION--**
        If you'd like further  information or  would like to join
        AtariNet-please contact one of the following via AtariNet
        or Fido: Bill Scull Fido 1:363/112 AtariNet 51:1/0,  Dean
        Lodzinski Fido 1:107/633 AtariNet 51:4/0,  Terry May Fido
        1:209/745 AtariNet 51:2/0, Tony Castorino Fido 1:102/1102
        AtariNet 51:3/0,   Don  Liscombe  AtariNet 51:5/0,  Daron
        Brewood Fido 2:255/402 AtariNet 51:6/0. You can also call
        the Z*Net News Service at (908) 968-8148 for more info.
 ========================================================================
 Reprints from the GEnie  ST  Roundtable   are  Copyright (c)1992,  Atari
 Corporation and the GEnie ST RT.  Reprints  from CompuServe's AtariArts,
 AtariPro,  AtariVen,  or Aportfolio Forums  are  Copyright (c)1992, CIS.
 ========================================================================
 Reprints from AtariUser Magazine are Copyright(c)1992, Quill Publishing.
 You  can  subscribe  and  read ALL  of the informative articles each and 
 every month by contacting Quill at (818) 246-6277.   For $15.00 you will
 receive 12 issues.  Send your payment to AtariUser Magazine,  249  North
 Brand Boulevard, Suite 332, Glendale, California, USA, 91203.    Foreign
 delivery is $30.00 in US funds.
 ========================================================================
 Atari is a registered trademark of Atari Corporation.   Atari Falcon030, 
 TOS, MultiTOS, NewDesk and BLiTTER, are trademarks of Atari Corporation.
 All  other  trademarks  mentioned in this publication  belong  to  their 
 respective owners.
 ========================================================================
                 **--** Z*NET OFFICIAL INFORMATION **--**
        =========================================================
 Z*Net Atari Online Magazine is a weekly online publication covering the
 Atari and related computer community.  Material published in this issue
 may be reprinted under the following terms only: articles  must  remain
 unedited and  include  the  issue number and author  at the top of each
 article reprinted.  Reprint  permission  is  granted, unless  otherwise
 noted at the beginning of the article, to  registered Atari user groups
 and not for profit  publications.   Opinions  present  herein are those
 of the individual authors and do not reflect those of the staff.   This
 publication is not affiliated with the Atari Corporation.  Z*Net, Z*Net
 News Service, Z*Net International,  Rovac, Z*Net Atari Online and Z*Net
 Publishing  are  copyright (c)1992, Syndicate Publishing,  PO Box 0059,
 Middlesex, NJ 08846-0059, Voice: (908) 968-2024,   BBS: (908) 968-8148,
 (510) 373-6792.
 ===~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~==
                       Z*Net Atari Online Magazine
           Copyright (C)1992, Syndicate Publishing - Ron Kovacs
 ===~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~==






Visit Atarimax Store