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Article #326 (730 is last):
From: aa789@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Bruce D. Nelson)
Newsgroups: freenet.sci.comp.atari.mags
Subject: Z*Net: 27-Dec-92 #9224
Reply-To: aa789@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Bruce D. Nelson)
Posted-By: xx004 (aa789 - Bruce D. Nelson)
Date: Sun Dec 27 19:09:40 1992



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                       Z*NET: ATARI ONLINE MAGAZINE
                       ----------------------------
 
    December 27, 1992          Issue #24          Volume 7, Number 24
 
             Copyright (c)1992, Syndicate Publishing Company

          ~ Publisher/Editor..........................Ron Kovacs
          ~ Senior Editor..............................John Nagy
          ~ Assistant Editor...........................Ed Krimen
          ~ Writer............................Michael R. Burkley
          ~ Writer.....................................Bob Smith
          ~ Z*Net News Service NZ.....................Jon Clarke
 
          $ GEnie Address..................................Z-NET
          $ CompuServe Address........................75300,1642
          $ Delphi Address..................................ZNET
          $ Internet/Usenet Address................status.gen.nz
          $ America Online Address......................ZNET1991
          $ AtariNet Address...........................51:1/13.0

      * Z*Net: News Service FNET 593  AtariNet 51:1/13 (908) 968-8148
      * Z*Net: Golden Gate  FNET 706  AtariNet 51:1/9  (510) 373-6792

                             **--CONTENTS--**

        ### The Editors Desk...........................Ron Kovacs
        ### Z*Net Newswire.............................Ron Kovacs
        ### The Year In Review 1992 - Part Three.......Ron Kovacs
        ### Perusing GEnie..............................Ed Krimen
        ### Sculley Speech At Conference.........................
        ### Photo CD........................................Kodak
        ### Connect - New Telecom Magazine..........Press Release
        ### Z*Net 1993 Computer Calender..................Updated
        ### The Unabashed Atariophile.............Michael Burkley
 
 
 
 ######  THE EDITORS DESK
 ######  By Ron Kovacs
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 This is the LAST edition of Z*Net for 1992.  In this issue we conclude
 our 1992 Year In Review.
 
 END OF YEAR COMMENTS
 
 In reflecting this year 1992, all I can say is come on 1993.  This year
 was a very long trying one.  There was the merger with Atari Explorer,
 which went from exciting with the first issue to a bad note on the
 second release after the resignation of John Janischigg.  My marital
 status changed and the new world of rearing children of divorced parents
 began.  The sudden loss of a close and dear friend, Stan Lowell, and
 numerous other "poor luck" situations arose.
 
 However, these tribulations are not stated here for sympathy.  I know
 for a fact that a few other Atarians also expirenced some hard times
 this year and with only a week to go, we have 1993 to look forward to.
 With the new year, a new beginning.  Let's all start the new year off on
 a positive note, leave the complaining behind us and try to help other
 Atari users.
 
 Z*Net returns in 1993 with Z*Net PC News and our Atari Online Magazine.
 The entire staff of Z*Net wishes everyone best wishes for the holidays
 and hope 1993 brings better things for everyone.  We thank you for
 reading Z*Net and supporting us through all of trying times this year.
 As I do every year, I want to thank the following for their assistance
 during the year and if I fail to list anyone's name here, please forgive
 me.
 
 John Nagy and Bob Brodie for their support and ears, Bob Smith, Sandra
 Burns, Dr. Paul Keith, Ed Krimen, Mike Mezaros, Mike Davis, Bill Scull,
 Bruce Hansford, Lisa Ruff, Darlah Potechin, Ron Luks, John Tarpinian,
 Steve Rider, Mike Burkley, Ron Berinstein, Jon Clarke, Linda Lowell,
 Alan Schneider, Steve Scavone, Laura Kovacs, Bill Whiteman, John
 Janischigg, Gene Kovacs, and prayers to Stan Lowell and family, who is
 still greatly missed around here.
 
 
 
 ######  Z*NET NEWSWIRE
 ######  Atari and Industry News Update
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 WORDPERFECT TO GO PUBLIC
 WordPerfect is planning to go public with a stock offering that may
 raise as much as $250 million, according to PC Week magazine in it's
 December 21 edition.
 
 
 STEVEN ROSS DIES AT 65
 Steven J. Ross, chairman of Time Warner died last week at 65.  Ross, who
 had been on a leave of absence from the company undergoing treatment for
 prostate cancer, died "peacefully,."  Ross became chairman and co-chief
 executive officer of Time Warner in May 1990, following the merger of
 Warner Communications Inc. (WCI) with Time Inc.  Since the early 1960s,
 Ross was among the pioneers of new interactive electronic technologies.
 Prior to the creation of Time Warner, Ross founded and served as
 chairman and chief executive officer of Warner Communications Inc.
 Under his leadership, WCI's revenues grew from $17 million in 1961 to
 $4.2 billion in 1988.  Over the same period, the company's market value
 increased from $12 million to $14 billion.  A cable partnership with WCI
 and American Express Co., created and launched Nickelodeon, a cable
 channel for children; The Movie Channel, the nation's first 24-hour pay
 service; and in 1981 the phenomenal MTV: Music Television cable channel.
 Services will be private and Ross's family asked in that lieu of
 flowers, contributions be made to the New York Police Department Police
 Athletic League and the Children's Health Fund.  A memorial service will
 be held in January.
 
 
 FCC FINES $600,000
 The FCC has imposed a $600,000 fine against Infinity Broadcasting which
 employs Howard Stern, contending it aired "indecent broadcasts" by the
 controversial radio personality known for raunchy language that many
 deem offensive. The largest fine of its kind was imposed against
 Infinity which licenses WXRK-FM in New York, WYSP-FM in Philadelphia,
 and WJFK-FM in Manassas, Va.  Those stations carry Stern's morning talk
 show.  Stern is an acerbic, long-haired radio host known as a "shock
 jock" for the content of his broadcasts, which some people find
 shocking, off-color and offensive.  His remarks have touched on sex,
 AIDS and minorities.
 
 
 

 ######  Z*NET NEWS YEAR IN REVIEW - PART THREE
 ######  By Ron Kovacs
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 This week we conclude the regular Z*Net tradition of looking back at the
 year in review.  We are focusing on the events we COVERED in Z*Net and
 Atari Explorer issues in 1992.  Last week we covered February thru May
 1992.
 
 
                            **--JUNE 1992--**

 GEnie's "Hot Summer Days" sale is announced.  From June 15 to September
 7, GEnie's prime time hourly connect charge is reduced from $18.00 per
 hour to $12.50 per hour.
 
 Floppyshop announces the release of "Family Roots".  The program is
 designed around a fully functional integrated workbench which is ideal
 for both the serious and beginner user.
 
 FBI agents raid a Boston computer BBS suspected of illegally
 distributing copyright software to subscribers in 36 states and 11
 foreign countries - including Iraq.  No arrests were made in the raid on
 the Davy Jones Locker BBS in Millbury, Mass., but computers and
 telecomunications equipment were seized, along with financial and
 business records.
 
 MCI Chairman William G. McGowan dies at age 64 after suffering a heart
 attack.
 
 The Second Milwaukee Atari Show is held by the Milwaukee Atari ST User
 Group (MAST).
 
 The Blue Ridge Atari Computer Enthusiasts (BRACE) holds the Third Annual
 Blue Ridge Atarifest.  Mike Groh of Atari is in attendance.

 ISD announces the winning entries in the 2nd Annual Calamus Family
 Creativity and Design Contest.
 
 Intersect Software is still in business and supporting the Atari.  They
 are rewriting Interlink to take advantage of all ST/STE/TT (and Falcon?)
 resolutions.
 
 MIDImouse Music developes a set of four individual programs that combine
 tutorials and drill aides for beginning and intermediate music students.
 Note Wizard, Scale Master, Chord Magic, and Rhythm Time.
 
 Atari searches on for a replacement editor for Atari Explorer Magazine.
 
 Atari announces that the tentative North American debut of the Falcon030
 will be at the Boston Computer Society on September 23, 1992.
 
 Darek Mihocka announces that debut of GEMulator I will debut at the
 Glendale Atarifest.
 
 On the subject of the Atari ST Book, John Townsend states on GEnie, "The
 STBook is still in the works.  We should have some to sell in the near
 future.  I think the problem has been a number of production mess-ups.
 I think these problems have been cleared up and we should be seeing the
 STBook in the very near future."
 
 FSMGDOS delays continue.  John Townsend states, "Packaging isn't the
 hold up.  The hold up has been legal problems.  We are attempting to get
 this straightened out as soon as we can.  Believe it or not, we don't
 develop products and just sit on them to spite anyone.  We really want
 to sell the stuff.  Unfortunately, producing products is a a process
 that involves a LOT of people and steps.  If a delay is encountered in
 a step, it throws off the rest of the steps after that step.  Those are
 just the facts."
 
 Invision Elite is announced.  This program allows you to create
 sophisticated black and white raster images.  A demo version is released
 with an announced release date of August 1, 1992.
 
 Atari holds a developer conference in London with over 120 developers in
 attendance.  Attendance at the confernce was by invitation only which
 included staff from Atari Sunnyvale including Sam Tramiel, Bill Rehbock
 and John Skruch.
 
 
                            **--JULY 1992--**

 This month marks the 20th anniversary of Atari and the 8th anniversary
 of the Tramiel ownership.
 
 Atari Advantage Magazine announces an exclusive article and interview
 to be published with Bill Rehbock about the new Atari Falcon computer.
 
 ST-Report Online Magazine publishes defamitory information about
 AtariUser Editor in Chief John Nagy and Atari Corp..  Nagy called the
 editor of the publication to complain and request removal of the issue
 from all the distribution services, later a new issue was released minus
 the offending comments.
 
 Nintendo and Atari announce that Atari has withdrawn its appeal of a
 jury verdict and judgment in favor of Nintendo in Atari's antitrust case
 against Nintendo.  Nintendo decides it will not proceed with its request
 to recover certain court costs from Atari.
 
 Gribnif Software moves to new offices.  The new address and telephone
 numbers are: P.O. Box 779, Northampton, MA 01061.  Main line (including
 technical support): (413) 247-5620.  Fax line (24 hours): (413) 247-5622
 
 Citizen Watch announces it has developed the world's thinnest 3.5 inch
 floppy disk drive for use in portable computers.  The disk drive will be
 able to handle floppy disks of 1 megabyte, 1.6 megabytes, and 2
 megabytes.
 
 Lewis Galoob Toys announces that it has been awarded a $15 million
 judgment against Nintendo.
 
 The Mid-Indiana ST's MIST Atarifest IV is held in Indianapolis.
 
 Chicago area residents had the opportunity to play and win one of at
 least 45 Atari Lynx Color Portable Video Game Systems during the 1992
 Taste of Chicago.
 
 Taylor Ridge Books announces the release of The GFA-BASIC Toolkit,
 Volume 1, which contains a wealth of programming routines for GFA-BASIC
 programmers, written by John Hutchinson of Fair Dinkum Technologies.
 
 SDS announces that it will be distributing an ST version of Fotoman with
 software.
 
 "It's All Relative" gets license for distribution and use of Photo CD
 software.  They plan on offering a conversion service for Photo CD to ST
 readable format starting on or about August 1.  The new Photo CD system
 requires a mode 2, XA, multi-session drive for full use.
 
 Bob Brodie, Atari's Director of Communications updates the status of the
 ST Book on GEnie.  "The initial ST Books that Atari manufactured were
 with one meg of ram, and a forty meg hard disk.  While that is a very
 usable unit to a lot of people, we felt that the US market would prefer
 a 4 meg of ram, 40 meg hard disk.  So, Atari US didn't order any of
 those units.  At present, we re-evaluating the decision NOT to include
 a backlit screen."
 
 Darlah Potechin begins a new feature on GEnie.  "Darlah's Treat - The
 Free File Of The Month!"  Each month the roundtable will offer a file
 for free download.
 
 ISD Marketing changes it's name to DMC Publishing.
 
 Atari Advantage ceases publishing operations after only three issues, as
 the publisher and editor have been hired to take over production of
 Atari's in-house magazine, Atari Explorer.  Mike Lindsay and Darren
 Meers relocate to Sunnyvale to pilot the glossy bi-monthly Explorer
 after their short but well-received stint producing their own Atari
 magazine.
 
 Lombard Illinois offices of Atari Entertainment relocate to Sunnyvale.
 Home of the Lynx development team, Lombard will remain open as a
 programming center, but sales, marketing, and support for the Lynx and
 soon the Jaguar will be part of the California operation under the
 guidance of Bernie Stolar.  Leaving Atari are Larry Seigal and Dana
 Plotkin, who did not wish to relocate.
 
 An August 3, 1992 issue of Forbes Magazine recounts the Atari story in a
 two-page article called "Cheap Didn't Sell" by Dyan Machan.  The famed
 business/industry reporting magazine blames Atari's troubles on the
 Tramiel family's penny pinching.  The article does mention the new line
 of Falcon computers and the Jaguar game console, but speculates that
 Atari has less than half of the cash needed to perform an appropriate
 roll-out of the new products.
 
 Superbase database systems were acquired by Oxxi Inc. who will offer
 upgrades for the popular line of software.
 
 ICD announces The Link, a new host adaptor that will enable standard ST
 computers to use industry standard SCSI devices, including hard drives,
 CD ROM drives, and flopticals designed for IBM, MAC, and Amiga.
 
 AtariUser Magazine announces a promotional price cut in their home
 subscription rates.  New and renewal subscribers can take a $5 discount
 and pay just $15 for one year, 12 issues of the magazine with standard
 3rd class delivery.
 
 Supra releases 2 new 9600 modems - the 9600 Supra FaxModem v.32 and
 the 14400 Supra FaxModem v.32bis at a retail price of $299.95 and
 $399.95 respectively.
 
 John Jainschigg completes the last issue of Atari Explorer under his
 direction.

 Atari completes porting UNIX to the Atari platform, but for the full
 power of UNIX, with a complete windowing environment, Atari prefers to
 wait for a 68040 based machine.  Until those products are ready, they
 table all plans for UNIX.
 
 "Right Sizing" at Atari continues.  Atari Canada evolves into a sales
 office, still headed up by Geoff Earle.  All support services are
 handled out of Sunnyvale.  Atari Project manager Art Pruzynski moves
 into a US Sales position and National Sales Manager Mike Groh leaves.
 
 Atari announces that the first public unveiling of the Falcon030 will be
 at the Atari Messe in Duesseldorf, Germany in late August.
 
 The GEnie ST RT receives it's 25,000th uploaded file.
 
 Atari Advantage Magazine is sold to Castle Publishing in Texas.
 
 The First Annual "Digital Quill" awards for excellence in electronic 
 publishing are announced.   Regular Computer/Technical Publication - a
 weekly, monthly or bi-monthly publication that has been in publication
 for 6 months or more relating to computers or technology. #1 Winner:
 "Files and Stuff" newsletter; Henry Barfoot and Lupe Tingle, Editors.
 #2 First Runner-up: "EFFector" (Electronic Frontier Foundation Online)
 newsletter, Rita M. Rouvalis, Editor.  #3 Second Runner-up: "Z*Net PC"
 newsletter, Ron Kovacs, Editor.
 
 
                           **--AUGUST 1992--**

 Atari's Director of Communications reports that he has recently had a
 number of complaints about a certain mail order firm based in Florida.
 It seems that this particular firm, which does not have authorization
 to purchase TT030's directly from Atari, has been taking orders AND
 PAYMENT of TT030s and TT030 monitors.
 
 Maxwell C.P.U., the developers of Silhouette, Fractal Fantasy, Expose
 and Megstenders, move east to Maryland.  Maxwell CPU, 1533 Meyer's
 Station Rd., Odenton, MD 21113, Phone: (301)261-0637.
 
 A federal judge decides that he will not reconsider most of Apple's
 copyright infringement suit against Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard that
 he had previously thrown out.
 
 The US House gives final congressional approval to a measure that
 attempts to further curb "indecent" television and radio programming.
 
 Innerprise US decides to drop ST support.
 
 Microprose UK was deluged with letters from ST gamers who wanted to play
 Civilization on their machines, so they gave in.  Civilization will be
 completed for the Atari.
 
 The Midwest Atari Regional Council, a coalition of Midwestern users
 groups, presented MARC Fest '92 in Collinsville, IL.
 
 The Connecticut AtariFest '92 is held.
 
 Atari launches it's new Falcon030 at the Dusseldorf Atari Messe with
 claims that the long awaited machine is not so much an evolution as a
 revolution-and with both journalists and dealers agreeing that for once,
 the enthusiasm is richly deserved.
 
 Sam Tramiel is the guest host of an online conference on GEnie and
 details Falcon news released at the Dusseldorf Atari Messe Show.
 
 
                          **--SEPTEMBER 1992--**

 Atari's Bill Rehbock hosts two online conferences and details further
 information about the Falcon.
 
 Atari announces quarterly financial reports showing a net loss of 39.7
 million dollars.  According to Atari employees, there is at least $60
 million available in cash at this time to launch the new line of
 computers.
 
 Migraph introduces a new full-page scanner, as well as an upgraded
 Touch-Up software package.
 
 Hayes and Zenith announce an amicable out-of-court settlement of the
 patent infringement litigation between the two-companies involving the
 Hayes '302 Escape Sequence Patent.
 
 InfoWorld publishes an article on Microsoft's use of "undocumented"
 APIs (Applications Programming Interfaces) in its applications for the
 Microsoft Windows operating system, raising the issue of whether or not
 this constituted an unfair advantage over its competitors.
 
 DragonWare Software announces that it will release SCSI EtherNet and
 Direct Ethernet in January 1993.
 
 Atari announces that it is now taking commercial-level developer orders
 for the production-level Atari Falcon030.  These developer machines are
 shipped with 14MB of RAM and a 65MB harddisk.
 
 Gribnif Software announces the release of CardFile 4.  A Personal
 Information Manager software for the Atari ST/TT.
 
 Synergy Resources announces the release of an updated version of
 GEMvelope! the envelope printer.
 
 Oregon Research announces the addition of two new programs to their line
 of ST software: Diamond Edge and The Ultimate Virus Killer.
 
 Double Click Software announces The Storm by Alan Page.  Page was the
 author of Flash, a telecommunications program for the ST.  Storm is said
 to be the next step for telecommunications software.
 
 DragonWare Software Releases PowerDOS as Freeware.
 
 San Diego ACE participates in a multi-platform Computer Fair in which
 nearly 10,000 attend the show.
 
 The Fall Seybold Show is held.  This was one of the top industry trade
 shows specializing in high-end publishing.
 
 Stan Lowell, long time Z*Magazine editor and contributor to other Z*Net
 projects dies at age 46 of heart attack.
 
 Sam Tramiel and Bill Rehbock attend a special taping for the program
 PCTV in New Hampshire.
 
 John King Tarpinian, Glendale show spokesperson and organizer, announces
 the 1993 Glendale Show for September 18 - 19, 1993.
 
 CompuServe and Visa announce a new five-year, $72 million agreement for
 CompuServe to provide network services for VisaNet, the bank card
 association's point-of-sale (POS) authorization and settlement network
 used by retailers.
 
 Sony introduces the first portable, self-contained Multimedia CD-ROM
 Player.
 
 A 16-year-old computer hacker faces fraud charges for allegedly using
 his computer to break into a long-distance telephone service system and
 charge more than $10,000 worth of calls.
 
 The FCC issues new rules governing the telemarketing field, with the aim
 of cutting back on intrusive telephone solicitations.
 
 Nearly 2,500 people meet at the Southern California Atari Computer
 Faire, Version 6.0, (The Glendale Show).  It was another major success
 for organizer John King Tarpinian and his HACKS user group.  This show
 series featured the first ever Atari Corporate participation in a user
 group show when it began seven years ago, and with a single
 interruption, what has become known as "The Glendale Show" has been a
 top draw in every year since.
 
 Another first for Glendale is an online conference after the event
 with show organizers and representatives from Atari Corporation.  Bob
 Brodie states during the conference, "We were very impressed with the
 upbeat mood of the crowd, and the sales that our dealers reported.  Even
 though the attendance was a little bit down this year, the dealers
 reported higher sales.  So we were very pleased.  In addition, we had a
 chance to spend quite a bit of time with Jerry Pournelle.  And he was
 impressed.  All in all, a very upbeat, postitive weekend."
 
 Atari announces its new multitasking operating system, called MultiTOS
 in Boston.  Available with the new Atari Falcon030 personal integrated
 media machine, the system is said to be available in November at Atari
 distributors around the country.
 
 Bill Rehbock states "quite soon" on the release of FSMGDOS.
 
 The July/August issue of Atari Explorer Magazine begins to appear in
 readers hands.
 
 The Atari Portfolio begins to appear in a number of films and television
 series like, "Made In America" with Whoppi Goldberg and Ted Danson, and
 in the TV show "Parker Lewis Can't Lose" on the FOX network.
 
 The Atari Falcon030 made its official US premier at a press conference
 at a Boston Computer Society meeting on September 23 1992.  This was the
 "rollout" for the new computer that had already made sneak preview
 appearances at the California Glendale Show as well as at Atari Messe in
 Germany.
 
 As part of the diversification of Quill Publishing, the successful
 AtariUser Magazine has establishes its own separate office and staff.
 249 North Brand Boulevard, Suite 332, Glendale, CA 91203 818-246-6277
 
 Festival Atari de Montreal et Environs is held and was the first Atari
 Fest held in the Montreal area in four years.  The show is attended by
 a little over 200 people.  Although the show was relatively small, the
 enthusiasm and interest of the participants more than made up for the
 low turnout.
 
 
                           **--OCTOBER 1992--**

 Atari Explorer Online Magazine goes on hiatus as editor Ron Kovacs
 announces the return of Z*Net Online Magazine.  New editors are to take
 over the regular duties.  Kovacs states, "There has been a lot of
 speculation as to why the return of Z*Net, and more recently, rumors
 spreading about a falling out or even something more disasterous.  There
 is nothing further from the truth about the seperation, it was amicable,
 friendly and our relationship remains very strong.  Our hopes are that
 the two online magazines enhance each other."
 
 Atari Corp continues to re-shape itself in preparation for 1993's
 marketing of their new products.  Trimming more people and places from
 the expense column this fall is the announced closing of Atari's Dallas,
 Texas research and development labs.  Forty employees and programmers
 working there have been offered relocated jobs at the Sunnyvale,
 California headquarters of Atari.  It's said that a few employees who
 are now job shopping have a resume entry that states that their latest
 completed project was the Atari 68040 design.
 
 Eric Smith, the original MiNT multitasking programmer whose project is
 the basis for the upcoming MultiTOS, starts full-time work at Atari and
 Ken Badertscher accepts a position with Taligent, the IBM/Apple project
 consortium.
 
 Bernie Stolar resigns.  Bernie's accomplishments during his 9-month stay
 include many game development contracts for Atari computers, management
 of the consolidation of the Entertainment division, and hiring of the
 new Atari Explorer magazine staff.
 
 Alwin Stumpf resigns as long-time head of Atari Germany.
 
 The Sheraton Reston in Virginia had another full house at this year's
 WAACE Atari festival attended by 1,200 to 1,400 people, down from last
 year's 2,000, 40 vendors still made their traditional record breaking
 sales.  Atari sends Bill Rehbock and several Falcons to the event.
 
 Jon Clarke of Z*Net's Global News Gateway hosts worldwide real-time
 conference from the head office of the HongKongBank in Hong Kong.  This
 is the first link to Hong Kong and a view of Atari dealers there.
 
 C-Lab, developers and manufacturers of Atari MIDI sequencing programs,
 Creator and Notator, are taken over by a new company formed by Ensoniq,
 the US distributors of C-Lab as well as a line of electronic hardware
 for the music industry.  EMAGIC will maintain support and development of
 the Atari platform, and includes some of the same people who were C-Lab.
 
 Zubair Interfaces develops the Z-RAM/Falcon, a 4 or 16 Megabyte upgrade
 board for the as yet unavailable Atari Falcon030.
 
 America Online announces that more than 200,000 households are now
 subscribing to the company's popular consumer online services.
 
 The third annual Houston "Atari Safari" is held and is said to be a
 success.  Nearly 200 attend along with Bob Brodie and Atari developers.
 
 
                          **--NOVEMBER 1992--**
 
 Gribnif Software announces the release of XBoot III, a "faster, more
 compatible and more flexible than ever" version of their boot manager.
 
 Joppa Software announces the release of STraight FAX! Version 1.06, a
 maintenance upgrade from Version 1.05 which was released at the WAACE
 AtariFest '92 in October.
 
 Oregon Research announces that they have begun supporting the HiSoft
 family of products for the North American market.

 Dave Small announces that he is starting to go through the back log of
 messages, faxes and email during his absense.  Small states, "Gadgets is
 definitely doing fine, we're not leaving Atari, and we have new things
 under development.  The SST accelerator has been shipping since February
 and MegaTalk has been shipping since September, Spectre GCR 3.0 has an
 extensive facelift ongoing."
 
 Atari is the sponsor of MTV's Halloween Dance Party where the Atari LYNX
 is used in a contest that takes place about 15 minutes or so, where the
 winner would receive a Lynx.
 
 The first 030 machines arrive in Germany but it is only about 200.  As
 for England they are said to have about 2000 machines before Christmas,
 and Germany some more, but there will be no mass sale until early '93.
 
 Dragonware Software announces that it has been unable to renew its
 license to manufacture PowerNet.  Both PowerDOS and PowerNet have been
 sold by the programmer to ViewTouch Corporation.
 
 The Independent Association of Atari Developers announces the election
 of a new, expanded Board of Directors.  Newly-elected Board members
 include: Nathan Potechin of ISD/DMC, Nevin Shalit of Step Ahead
 Software, Jim Allen of FAST Technology, Chet Walters of Wizworks!, and
 Dorothy Brumleve of D.A. Brumleve.  Brumleve will serve as President.
 
 Commodore unveils the Amiga 1200 which incorporates Commodore's 32-bit
 Advanced Graphics Architecture (AGA) and comes with a 3.5-inch floppy
 drive, 2MB of RAM and an internal IDE interface.
 
 Atari appears at COMDEX.  John Nagy comments in his review of the event,
 "It was Atari's most confusingly upbeat but self-distracted COMDEX
 showings to date.  Showing dozens of Falcon030 computers in a new and
 spacious booth, Atari Corp again used the USA's largest trade show to
 try to show what third-party developers have for the platform.  They did
 it to a fault, almost to the point of downplaying the remarkable power
 of the new Atari hardware itself.  And like the story of the blind men
 around an elephant, impressions made on the fleeting passersby were
 likely to be unfairly singular and disjoint.  Overheard while someone
 passed on the side of the booth where games were showing:  "Huh.  Atari.
 Just games.  Oh well."  Wrong.  But he'll never know differently.  Large
 quantities of empty floor space within the booth didn't help Atari make
 points, either."
 
 Sam Tramiel attends a conference on GEnie live from COMDEX.  Sam opened
 the conference by stating "The important thing is to market the machine
 properly and we are now planning the advertising for Q1 of 1993.  The
 (Jaguar) just finished the first two developer conferences, one in
 Sunnyvale, the other in London.  It's going to be an awesome
 entertainment machine and delivery will be 2nd half of 93."
 
 IBM's OS/2 2.0 receives top honors from three PC industry publications,
 including two awards presented at Comdex.
 
 WordPerfect announces its first-ever television advertising campaign,
 premiering three 60-second commercials in support of the company's
 "Beyond Words" marketing campaign introduced at Comdex.
 
 Penthouse magazine launches Penthouse OnLine while Gennifer Flowers
 makes electronic appearances during the event.
 
 Lexicor Software announces that Phoenix, will be released in December.
 Phoenix will enable ST computer users to create stunning 512-color
 animations as well as still images.
 
 Atari announces the availability of The 1992 International Software
 Catalog (Item# C303288-001).
 
 On the topic of Word-Up, John Townsend states on GEnie, "I am sorry that
 your $140 investment was wasted on WordUp.  I wish something different
 was going to come of it, but alas I am afraid that WordUp is probably
 dead at this point.  But, remember, Atari didn't get one red cent of
 your money.  All we did was purchase the source code from a company that
 was about to go under and attempt to save a product from going down with
 it.  Unfortunately, the source code was in about the same state as the
 company.  The good news is that Atari will have a program called ST
 Works which will have a good word processor, spreadsheet, and database
 in one program!"
 
 Sam Tramiel announces during his online conference that ST Sutra (the
 MSWorks- like multi-program nearing release) is being renamed
 "Concierge".
 
 Atari announces an advertising campaign and offer for the Atari Lynx
 Portable.  For a limited time you can purchase an Atari Lynx for just
 $79.95.
 
 Atari Explorer Online Magazine announces the return of regular release
 in early December.
 
 With this being December real fresh in the minds of everyone, we will
 save you the re-read.  We have covered 12 months from December 1992
 through November 1992.  See you next in the Year In Review: 1993.
 
 

 
 ######  PERUSING GENIE
 ######  Compiled by Ed Krimen
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 Some messages may have been edited for correct spelling, grammar, and
 irrelevant material.
 
 
 BOB, WHERE ARE THOSE FALCONS?!
 ------------------------------
 -=> In the "Atari Corporation Online" category (14)
 -=> from the "Atari Falcon 030 Computer" topic (20)
 
 Message 116       Sat Dec 19, 1992
 BOB-BRODIE [Atari Corp.]     at 23:59 EST
 
 Sam did indeed realistically expect Falcons to hit in October, and the
 date slipped for the US.  There was a problem that I am not at liberty
 to discuss, although I will say that it was not technical in nature.
 Among other concerns were slow negoitations with companies for some of
 the products that we want to have either bundled with the Falcon030, or
 have available at the same time.  For example, the Photo-CD software is
 something that we very much want to bundle with the Falcon030.  However,
 that contract wasn't signed until November.  That creates a rather
 obvious problem in shipping the software.
 
 The demand for units by developers (current, new, and returnees) has
 been considerable.  All across the globe Atari Falcon030s have been in
 high demand.  While it is disappointing that they are not for sale in
 North America, it is very encouraging to see the demand from developers
 is extraordinarily high!  And it is for sale "on this planet", in
 Europe.
 
 I take exception to your description about the re-design of the ST Book,
 David.  We were highly criticized by people right here for the lack of
 the backlight on the ST Book.  We explained the intent of the unit, and
 the fact that backlighting it would dramatically reduce the viability of
 the unit as a notebook.  We went to NAMM and heard the very same
 concerns...and reacted.  "Without warning, we pulled the plug on the ST
 Book." Hardly!  We took the concerns of our dealers and users to heart
 and have the unit in for re-design.  If the "don't bother, it's no use"
 sentiment of your message is indeed correct, I'll be happy to pass that
 information along to the appopriate people here in Sunnyvale.
 
 And again, even though you don't like to hear it, we always indicated
 that the main push was slated for January. We got the "what no Falcon
 for Christmas?" messages _way back_ in August.  It was felt that by
 being up front and telling you realistically what we felt we could
 accomplish we were doing the right thing.  I still think that we were
 correct in being up front about it.  We should always tell what we can
 do, and when we believe we will be able to do it.
 
 Will the "story of the ST Book be the story of the Falcon030?"  NO!  The
 ST Book was regarded as an addition to the existing lineup of computers.
 It was/is, a highly portable unit.  Its main technical advantages were
 the incredible battery life, which was rejected by users and dealers as
 significant.  The Atari Falcon030 represents a substansial technical
 advancement in personal computing.  Publications like EQ recognize that,
 so does Electronic Musician, Keyboard, people like Jerry Pournelle,
 Craig Anderton, and CNN is talking extremely positive as well.
 
 In almost every instance where a developer has a Falcon030, they are
 pleased, and have new applications coming.  HiSoft has a terrific paint
 program coming, Lexicor is working on a bunch of stuff, JRI has a
 GENLOCK and a video digitizer, and of course there are brand new
 products like the voice mail system from D.O.A.  I wonder why those
 aren't being discussed?
 
 regards,
 Bob Brodie
 =======================================
 
 
 JOUST IS OUT!
 -------------
 -=> In the "Lynx - The Game Machine" category (36)
 -=> from the "Games - What is out there??" topic (2)
 
 Message 92        Wed Dec 23, 1992
 R.MUNOZ                      at 19:01 EST
 
 Yep!  JOUST IS OUT!!!!  I just got it today (12/23/92) at the local
 Electronics Boutique, and it is a very, very good translation!  Although
 I did not play Joust that much when it came out, I still enjoyed it, and
 from what I can remember, IT IS an extremely good translation; kudos to
 Shadowsoft for doing it again (although I still think Robotron is the
 best translation of all the Lynx games!).  In anycase it is out!
 
 The controls were handled well - either the A or B buttons are used to
 flap the wings to fly and the joypad is used to walk/fly in the
 direction that you press it; very simple!  I also believe the game is in
 stereo (correct me if I am wrong on this), with what I think are
 digitized sounds specially for the screeching of ostrich when you are
 trying to stop - very nice!
 
 Please, others that are more avid Joust players give your reviews when
 you get it!  Additionally, EB also had Dirty Larry and Dracula - The
 Undead!!! This latter one looks very nice!!  Has anyone gotten Dracula
 yet?  Please post info on it if you get it!  Take care...
 =======================================
 
 
 EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT FAX PROTOCOLS, I THINK
 ----------------------------------------------------------
 -=> In the "Hardware" category (4)
 -=> from the "Straight FAX! & Joppa FAX/Modems!" topic (24)
 
 Message 132       Tue Dec 22, 1992
 C.S.SMETON [STraight FAX]    at 05:29 EST
 
 Technically speaking a Class 2 Only FAX Modem is superior to a Class 1
 Only FAX Modem.  The FAX Modem is composed of 3 sub-systems: A
 microcontroller processor with a UART, RAM and ROM firmware, A FAX/Data
 Modem Data Pump (i.e. specialized Digital Signal Processor DSP), and the
 telephone interface ringer circuit.  The difference between Class 1 and
 Class 2 is in the FAX Modem firmware.  Supra FAX Modems support both
 Class 1 & Class 2.  Others are Class 1 only or Class 2 only.
 
 With Class 2, the low level timing and Group 3 FAX Protocol are
 performed by the microcontroller in the FAX Modem.  In Class 1, this is
 handled by the DTE computer.  Since the interface between the FAX Modem
 and Computer is a relatively slow RS-232 (19200 baud), this places an
 extra burden on the DTE computer as to the timing of commands.  Since
 most of the protocol work is performed by the DTE Computer, A Class 1
 only FAX Modem does not require as a powerful microcontroller as a Class
 2 FAX Modem.  As such there are some very inexpensive 2400 baud/Class 1
 FAX Modems available in the $80 range (i.e Zoom AFX).
 
 A FAX Modem that also supports V.32, V.32bis, V.42, V.42bis on the data
 side will also require a more powerful microcontroller.  So then why
 have companies like Hayes and US Robotics released Class 1 only FAX
 Modems?
 
 Answer: Politics.
 
 Hayes and US Robotics are members of the EIA/TIA TR29-2 committee that
 decides FAX standards.  Class 1 was approved in late 1990.  The first
 Class 2 ballot was presented later in 1990.  It has been re-written and
 submitted three more times before being approved recently.  Guess who
 has voted against it?
 
 After the first Class 2 ballot was voted down, chipset vendors such as
 Rockwell, Sierra Semiconductor and Exar decided to release products
 based on the first Class 2 ballot.  This created a bit of difficulty for
 software developers as each manufacturer's implementation varied
 slightly and it was possible that a program will work with one
 manufacturer's product but not on another.
 
 Why would the big name, high end Modem vendors not want Class 2 to be
 approved?  The answer is simple.  Rockwell, Sierra and Exar are big
 Semiconductor companies, not modem vendors.  They sell these chips to
 companies like Zoom, Supra, Cardinal & Practical Peripherals who in turn
 manufacturer the FAX Modem and sell in volume at a very competitive
 price.
 
 Hayes & US Robotics design the modem in house and have lost significant
 market share to these other modem vendors.  By voting against Class 2,
 they hoped to delay its availability and as such retain their market
 share.  It back fired when the Class 2 products hit the street.  Some of
 the people who work for these companies deny the existence of Class 2 as
 it is currently implemented.
 
 Since Class 2 has been approved in a much modified form from its
 original ballot, the official Class 2 is going to be called Class 2.0!
 Class 2.0 FAX Modems should be available within 6 months and possibly as
 firmware upgrades for existing FAX Modems.  In the mean time, the
 committee is now looking into Class 3 & 4, plus Voice Mail standards and
 Caller ID standards.  At the same time the CCITT is working on the non-
 computer related FAX standards called Group 4 and beyond.
 
 In some ways Class 2 is a restrictive layer over the low level Group 3
 protocol, however it removes much of the timing responsibility away from
 the DTE computer.  On an 8MHz 68000 (stock ST) or in a multitasking
 environment (Multi-TOS) this can be critical.  The best FAX Modems are
 those that support both Class 1 and Class 2.  On FAX Modems such as
 these it is possible to switch between Class 1 and Class 2, i.e. while
 in Class 2 the FAX Modem may be switched into Class 1 to issue commands
 that might not be possible in Class 2.
 
 Class 2 currently has its problems in implementation differences due to
 the lack of an approved standard.  Many Class 2 FAX Modems do not
 support all of the features that Class 2 defined, such as binary file
 transfer, error correction modes, and FAX polling.  Other capabilities
 such as Super Fine Resolution are not available in Class 2.  All of
 these capabilities can be accessed via Class 1, provided that the
 software application supports them.  The software program must issue the
 Group 3 commands that implement these capabilities.  Of course all of
 these capabilities will be available in Class 2.0.
 
 Our decision to support Class 1 is based on three factors:
 
 1.  Many established high end FAX Modems are Class 1 only by choice.
     There are many users who are loyal to these modem vendors and will
     not purchase other lesser known brands.
 
 2.  Many very low end FAX Modems are Class 1 only.  We may develop a
     special STraight FAX! Lite to be bundled by dealers/distributors
     with these FAX Modems to offer an entry level FAX modem with
     software at a very low price.
 
 3.  There are problems in some Class 2 implementations, since some of
     these FAX Modems also allow Class 1, the user will have a choice.
 
 On the negative side:
 
 1.  Class 1 requires more of the DTE computer's CPU overhead.  This may
     not be a problem with a TT/030, Falcon030 or other accelerated ST,
     however it will be on a stock 8 Mhz ST and it will be under
     Multi-TOS.
 
 2.  By the time we support Class 1, everyone will start to hear about
     Class 2.0 and how great it is.  Dont be suprised if there is a
     firmware upgrade available for a Hayes or USR FAX Modem to support
     Class 2.0 in six months.
 
 3.  Most users are moving away from 2400 baud only FAX Modems into V.32/
     V.32bis 9600/14400 baud FAX Modems.
 
 Charles Smeton 
 NewSTar Technology Management
 
 BTW, Class 3 will probably allow Text and TIFF files to be FAXed
 directly with the FAX Modem doing all of the conversion.
 =======================================
 
 
 A CLOSE-UP LOOK AT THE FALCON
 -----------------------------
 -=> In the "Atari Corporation Online" category (14)
 -=> from the "Atari Falcon 030 Computer" topic (20)
 
 Message 126       Sun Dec 20, 1992
 EXPLORER.1 [] Ron []         at 11:59 EST
 
 Since Bob has taken the wraps off the production Falcon030 Atari was
 kind enough to send me to review for Atari Explorer, I would be happy to
 answer any questions I can.
 
 Having used a Falcon030 for over a week now, I believe anyone who has an
 opportunity to work with one will be pleased.  My kids love it and are
 encouraging (yea, right, how about demanding? :-) me to get the review
 finished *NOW* so they can get some more time at the wheel.  There were
 more than one "ahhh" experience accompanied by big grins as we
 discovered new and interesting aspects of the computer.  Falcon030 is
 flat out a very fun computer to mess around with.
 
 The near-photographic-quality graphics capability has to be seen to be
 appreciated; "specifications" simply do not seem to do it justice.  Just
 as a reality check, I took a trip to CompUSA today and saw nothing on
 display with video the quality of the Falcon030.
 
 For day-to-day work, the 256-color 640 x 480 mode works wonderfully
 providing a TT-like screen compatible with most applications; I'm using
 Stalker on the Falcon030 right now in color with full resolution on a
 NEC 3D.  That fact alone is enough to sell me.  There are three "ST
 compatibility" modes built into the video configuration menu - ST low,
 medium and high.  You can now even do ST hi-res on the Atari SC1224
 color monitor!
 
 Speed in using real world applications is much better than I expected,
 even in the higher resolution graphics modes.  I've been bouncing back
 and forth between the Falcon and a MSTe installed doing side by side
 work.  The Falcon looks and feels significantly faster in real world
 use.
 
 The digital sound is great.  Audio Fun Machine demos the DSP working
 with audio to generate special effects real time and will be a big hit
 at any party. There is no slow down at all as the DSP processes data.
 
 One opinion rolling around in my mind is the Falcon030 is not an ST.  It
 is a very different computer - much more different than the TT is from
 the ST.  Falcon030 is in new ways a greatly improved computer that just
 happens to be ST compatible.  I'd call it the Mazda Miata of computers:
 fast, fun, inexpensive and flashy. :-)  Not a bad combination for an
 entertainment product.
 
 1) There is some Flicker in truecolor mode on the SC1224 (on a Samsung
    SM1224 monitor).  I wouldn't know how to gauge how pronounced it is.
    With proper color and contrast adjustment, it is usable.  I don't
    think the flicker is any worse than interlaced VGA I have seen on
    PC's or Amiga.  Same physics at work I guess.  Same is true running
    in ST hi res or 256 color on the SM1224.
 
    Display quality on a NEC 3D is outstanding in all Falcon and ST
    graphics modes.  You end up with probably 25% more screen to work
    with in VGA 256 color mode compared to ST medium or high.
 
 2) A desktop window full of icons updates about 40% faster in 256 color
    mode compared to truecolor (on the SC1224).  256 color updates are
    about the same speed as my MSTe in monochrome mode.  The Falcon is
    about 35% faster in ST monochrome mode when compared to my MSTe in
    the same mode, (all timing comparisons *very* rough, non-scientific,
    measured by a stop watch).
 
 3) I noticed a folder full of ZOO'd files that look like they might be
    MultiTOS but I haven't had a chance to install it yet.  I pulled a
    couple "all-nighters" (remember those?) just trying to get the basics
    of the machine into words for the review.
 
 4) The Falcon030 I received came with a manual much like the MSTe/TT
    manual, Atari and VGA monitor adaptors, mouse, power cord, a Language
    (country) disk with; HDX, CPX, HINSTALL, etc. and a Extra Programs
    disk (1.44 meg) with two great games (Breakout and Landmines),
    Talking Clock - a high tech grandfather clock (who's voice is that
    Bob?  :-), CalAppointment - a great calendar PIM accessory, and
    Procalc which I believe was once a commercial product.  Included
    software will change with the units when they ship.  I'm fairly sure
    Audio Fun Machine (DSP based real time sound effects - pretty cool!)
    and D2D (Stereo direct to disk recorder) are on the list to be added
    - maybe more.
 
 5) Sorry, the only restriction Atari has placed me under is to avoid
    compatibility questions.  Developers are ultimately responsible for
    compatibility statements.  There are developers working on upgrades
    so it is not fair to single anyone out before the computer is in
    distribution.  Some developers have not yet had a chance to try their
    product on a Falcon030.  The many graphics modes makes compatibility
    testing a much larger job than we have had in the past.
 
    Please don't let the preceding statement scare anyone.  In limited
    testing on my part, compatibility looks very good.  I'd expect most
    applications advertised to work on the TT will do well on the
    Falcon030.  The desktop includes compatibility modes for each of the
    ST resolutions on a Atari and VGA monitors.  I will say I have found
    PD code that works on the Falcon030 that does not work on my MSTe,
    which I take as a good sign.  I think the Atari software group did a
    very good job in a difficult task to maintain software compatibility
    to the greatest extent possible.
 
 6) All the other ports work as expected.  A standard Workstation mini-
    SCSI cable works fine connected between the Falcon and my Syquest 88
    - so much for the custom cable rumor.
 
 A demo version of D2D was on the Falcon030 that Atari loaned me.  The
 program looks/sounds great and offers a ton of options.  You can fill a
 hard drive very quickly sampling 16-bit stereo at 50 KHz.
 
 The keyboard feels just like an ST or STe keyboard.  The 16-bit digital
 stereo keyclicks provide very good feedback.  .
 
 The version of ICD's Rate HD I have does not seem to know about IDE
 drives yet.  I need to order the PRO kit.  The internal IDE drive is
 preceptibly faster than the external SCSI (Syquest) I'm using for
 testing.
 
 I have not tried MultiTOS yet.
 
 A personal editorial comment on Falcon030 availability - I doubt anyone
 wants to be shipping Falcon030's right now more than the people at
 Atari.  Just something to think about.
 
 .. replies to questions asked in old Falcon 030 topic...
 
 T-Bird, I'm already working with developers on compatibility testing.
 Catch me in e-mail if you have something specific in mind.  GFA basic
 stuff seems to all work so far.
 
 Peter, nice to see we're helping out.  I'm heading out for vacation
 after Christmas and half regretting it, I want to play! :-) The computer
 will be loaned to a local developer who's doing some Photo CD work.  He
 is on GEnie and perhaps he'll stop on by while I'm gone and let you know
 what he thinks.
 
 Greg, you are right, there are definately NTSC and PAL versions of the
 Falcon.  You need a US unit to use it on a US TV.
 
 Sean, Falcon030 seemed to work great with the ST sound software I tried.
 The internal speaker is *loud* and sounds great for a built-in speaker.
 
 The fan is noise is noticable (the fan is a small PCB mount critter) but
 makes less noise than my MSTe.  The computer only gets a little warm to
 the touch, I'd say definately cooler than the 1040ST.  The surface mount
 board (_very_ clean design!) leaves lots of space between the chips for
 cooling, and everything does run cool.  The IDE drive is probably the
 largest heat generator and I'd guess it is less than 5 watts.
 
 Getting to the insides is relatively easy.  There is a top shield that
 pops off after removing a dozen screws.  You then have easy access to
 the hard drive, power supply, floppy drive, expansion slot, FPU socket
 (under power supply), TOS ROM <-one chip!) and RAM board.  Shouldn't
 take more than ten or fifteen minutes to get to anything and have things
 back together.  I see lots of opportunity for hardware hacking - maybe
 even adding RCA jacks. :-)
 
 Ron @ Atari Explorer Magazine
 =======================================
 

  

 ######  JOHN SCULLEY SPEECH AT ECONOMIC CONFERENCE
 ######  Reprint permission granted by Apple Computer Co.
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 This is a transcript of John Sculley's (Apple Computer Inc. CEO) remarks
 made at President-Elect Bill Clinton's Economic Conference in Little
 Rock, AK on December 15.  This file is from Apple Computer which grants
 permission to all for redistribution.
 
 
 Clinton Economic Conference- John Sculley's remarks:
 
 We are at a major turning point in the world economy.  This is a change
 as significant as the transformation of our 19th c. agricultural economy
 into the 20th c. industrial age a century ago.
 
 The hallmark of this 20th c. industrial economy has been mass production
 and mass consumption.
 
 The mass production/mass consumption model of business was pioneered in
 this country by early 20th century leaders like Henry Ford and the
 industrial engineer Fredrick Taylor.  This model assumed that all
 important decisions were centralized around a small managerial elite.
 "Thinking" was purposely separated from "doing".  Work was broken down
 into repetitive tasks, consciously eliminating as much decision making
 as possible by the workers.  Quality was defined around rigid
 standardization.  There was little flexibility in the work process.
 
 Perhaps the biggest change in this decade will be the reorganization of
 work.  That is, reengineering the ways in which work gets done
 productively.
 
 But here's a major problem.  Most Americans don't know what the New
 Economy is, yet it will dramatically impact their lives in the years
 ahead.  Today we measure economic health on internal comparisons like
 GDP growth and unemployment rates.  In the New Global Economy, the key
 indicator is standard of living, as measured externally by comparative
 productivity versus other industrialized trading regions.  Our high
 standard of living already requires higher productivity than the rest of
 the world (e.g. fortunately we are still ahead) but we are losing
 ground.  Real income is down.  Only the best educated/higher income
 families are holding their own.
 
 In the New Economy, that old industrial model is being replaced by a
 rapid move towards customization of goods and services and the
 decentralization of work.  Today, new products can be developed in a
 fraction of the time it took in the old industrial economy; services and
 products are being custom-built-to-order; quality is dramatically
 improving and costs are being driven down through the use of new
 technologies such as computer systems, robotics and measurements
 systems.
 
 In the New Economy workers are on the frontline interacting with
 customers and workers on the factory floor are empowered to make
 decisions.  This is the only way customized goods and services can be
 created quickly, with the highest quality, at the lowest cost and with
 the maximum flexibility.
 
 In the old economy, America had a real advantage because we were rich
 with natural resources and our large domestic market formed the basis
 for economies of scale. 
 
 In the New Economy, strategic resources no longer just come out of the
 ground (e.g. oil, coal, iron and wheat), the strategic resources are
 ideas and information that come out of our minds.
 
 The result is, as a Nation, we have gone from being resource rich in the
 old economy to resource poor in the new economy almost over night!  Our
 public education system has not successfully made the shift from
 teaching memorized facts to achieving the learning of critical thinking
 skills.  We are still trapped in a K-12 public education system which is
 preparing our youth for jobs that no longer exist.
 
 The New Economy is Global.  We are no longer alone at the top.  In fact,
 The United States is underprepared to compete with many other major
 industrialized trading regions in the world.
 
 Students in other industrialized countries are learning math, sciences
 and critical judgment skills more relevant to the New Economy.
 
 Other industrialized countries have an alternative path for the non-
 college bound including vocational study and a school-to-work transition
 which is tightly linked with apprenticeships and worker training in
 industry.
 
 We have few alternatives for non-college bound students so they can
 participate productively in the high skilled work of the New Economy.
 
 The greatest certainty about the New Economy is the pace of change.
 Young people in school today can reasonably expect to have 4 or 5
 careers.  Skill needs will constantly change too.  Education therefore
 must become a lifelong pursuit not just an institutional experience
 early in one's life.  Education, training and retraining must become as 
 much an ongoing experience in our lives as exercise and vacations.
 
 Most Americans see our largest corporations going through massive
 restructurings, layoffs and downsizing.  People know something has
 changed and they are scared because they don't fully understand it and
 they see people they know losing their jobs.
 
 They also see their neighbors buying high quality, lower priced products
 from abroad and they ask why we can't build these same products or
 better ones here at home?
 
 The answer is, we can.  But only if we have a public education system
 which will turn out a worldclass product.  We need an education system
 which will educate all our students, not just the top 15-20%.
 
 A Highly skilled work force must begin with a world class public
 education system.  Eventually, the New Economy will touch every industry
 in our Nation.  There will be no place to hide!
 
 In the New Economy, low skilled manual work will be paid less.  The
 United States can not afford to have the high skilled work being done
 somewhere else in the world and us ending up with the low wage work.
 
 This is not an issue about protectionism, it is an issue about an
 educational system aligned with the New Economy and a broad educational
 opportunity for everyone.
 
 The reorganization of work into decentralized, higher skilled jobs is
 the systemic key to a vital American economy in the future.  We are
 talking about the standard of living that we, and our children, and
 their children will have well into the 21st century.
 
 It's America's Choice: High Skills or Low Wages.
 

 
 ######  PHOTO CD
 ######  A Continuing Series
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 Note:  Eastman Kodak Company does not produce or market CD ROM drives.
 Kodak does not recommend or endorse any product listed or described in
 this guide.  The guide is offered as a courtesy to our customers and is
 for informational purposes only.  Kodak intends to update these
 guidelines on a monthly basis through early 1993.  Please call 1-800-
 242-2424, ext. 53 to provide feedback or to receive an updated version
 of the guide.
 
 * Contact the drive manufacturers for more complete information on CD
   ROM drive compatibility.
 
 (C) Eastman Kodak Company,1992  CD ROM Drive Guide (12/92)
 
 Photo CD System CD ROM Drive Compatibility Guidelines
 
 The introduction of the KODAK Photo CD syem has been enthusiastically
 greeted by computer users who are eager to use high-quality photographic
 images on the desktop.  However, the Photo CD system represents the
 first widely adopted use of multisession CD ROM technology.  And because
 it is so new, there has been some confusion about the CD ROM drives,
 related components, and software required to incorporate Photo CD
 technology into the desktop environment.  This guide is intended to help
 clear up some of the confusion.
 
 Eastman Kodak Company has tested all of the drives, related components,
 and device driver software listed in this guide (see Tables A.1, A.2,
 B.1, and B.2) for compatibility with the Photo CD format.  Each one of
 the drives herein has at least limited compatibility with the Photo CD
 format when they are used with the appropriate components and software
 (listed in the two columns adjacent to the drive column) and when they
 are part of one of the configurations described below.  There is,
 however, no guarantee that the drives listed will work properly with the
 customer's computer configuration.  The correct operation of the CD ROM
 drives and controllers with the customer's computer will depend on the
 correct version of device driver software and compatible computer
 peripheral hardware.  Substituting different drives, components, and
 software may cause incompatibility.  Customers should contact the CD ROM
 XA drive vendor with technical assistance questions.
 
 The following system configurations were used to test the drives:
 
 1.
 Compaq 486/33M (EISA bus) PC
 16 MB RAM
 340 MB hard disk drive
 MS DOS 5.0, WINDOWS 3.0 & 3.1
 Monochrome graphics display adaptor
 20" color monitor and 12" monochrome monitor
 SMC Ethernet card
 Compaq VGA display card
 Matrox Impression S/AT high-resolution display adaptor (24-bit)
 
 2.
 Dell 486D/50 (EISA bus) PC
 16 MB RAM
 212 MB hard disk drive
 MS DOS 5.0, WINDOWS 3.1
 17" color monitor
 Dell VGA adaptor (on mother board)
 
 3.
 IBM PS/2 Model 57
 4 MB RAM
 160 MB hard disk drive
 PC DOS 5.0, WINDOWS 3.1
 14" color monitor
 IBM XGA video adaptor
 
 4.
 MACINTOSH Quadra 700
 20 MB RAM
 160 MB hard disk drive
 19" color monitor
 SuperMac 24 PDQ Plus display adaptor (24-bit)
 
 Reading Photo CD Images
 
 In order to access Photo CD images on a computer, users need the
 following compatible components:
 
 a CD ROM XA-compatible (extended architecture)    Mode 2 Form 1 drive
 a CD ROM XA-compatible controller (also known as a host adaptor or
   controller board)
 a cable to connect the drive to the controller
 device driver software (low-level device driver and foreign file system
   driver)
 
 Together, these four components form a CD ROM XA-compatible drive
 subsystem.  Each component of the subsystem must be capable of
 supporting the Photo CD format.  It is essential that customers contact
 the drive manufacturers for specific information on the Photo CD
 compatibility of their CD ROM XA drive and subsystem components before
 purchasing those items.  Customers can also call the Kodak Information
 Center (1-800-242-2424, ext. 53) for current drive compatibility
 information.
 
 In addition to the hardware and driver software listed above, customers
 also need application software capable of accessing Photo CD images.
 Kodak offers a family of Photo CD-enabled software packages that can
 access, store, import, and enhance Photo CD images and high-quality
 digital images in other popular file formats.  Customers can call 1-800-
 242-2424, ext. 53 for more information on the KODAK Photo CD software
 offerings.
 
 Single Session Drives
 
 There are CD ROM XA-compatible drives available today which can access
 images written to a compact disc during a single recording session.
 These drives are known as single session drives.  The single session CD
 ROM XA-compatible drives listed in Tables A.1 and A.2 offer limited
 capability in reading Photo CD discs.
 
 Specifically, the single session CD ROM XA-compatible drives will read
 Photo CD images recorded onto a Photo CD disc in ONE session.  These
 drives will not recognize data appended (i.e., added) to a disc after
 the initial recording session, however.  A single session drive is
 suitable for anyone who wants to begin working with Photo CD images
 immediately and is able to limit data recording to one session per disc.
 
 Multisession Drives
 
 The Photo CD system offers the considerable advantage of allowing images
 to be appended to a disc in multiple recording sessions.  Users who want
 to take advantage of that capability will need multisession drives to
 read the data appended to discs in subsequent recording sessions.  The
 drives have been determined to be fully capable of playing multisession
 Photo CD discs.  Look for the Photo CD logo on drives that have passed
 Kodak's testing and are licensed in our Photo CD branding program.  Call
 1-800-242-2424, ext. 53 to learn more about the branding program for
 multisession drives.
 
 Single Session CD ROM Drive Subsystems with limited capability for
 reading Photo CD discs For IBM PC/AT Computers, IBM PS/2 Computers, and
 Compatible Computers:
 
 CD ROM, Inc. (SCSI bus) - CRI 1000i (internal and external)
 - Trantor controller: T128 (XT/AT only), T130 (XT/AT/EISA)
 - Software version 1.46d or later
 ------------------------------------------------------------------
 Chinon (SCSI bus) - CDX-435
 - Trantor controller:  T128 (XT/AT only), T130 (XT/AT/EISA)
 - Software version 1.46d or later
 ------------------------------------------------------------------
 Texel:  - DM3024 (internal) - DM5024 (external)
 - Trantor controller: T128 (XT/AT only), T130 (XT/AT/EISA)
 - Software version 1.46d or later.
 ------------------------------------------------------------------
 Toshiba:  - TXM3301B (internal)  - TXM3301E1 (external)
 - Trantor controller: T128 (XT/AT only), T130 (XT/AT/EISA)
 - Software version 1.46d or later.
 (Toshiba plans an upgrade to multi session.  Call 714-583-3129 for more
 information.)
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
 (choose either 1 or 2)
 NEC (SCSI bus)
 - CDR-73 (external)              1.  - NEC controller
 - CDR-83 (internal)                  - CD-XT002 (XT/AT only)
 - CDR-36M (portable, external)
 - CDR-37 (portable, external)         or
 - CDR-74 (external)
 - CDR-84 (internal)              2.  - Trantor controller
                                        T128 (XT/AT only), 
                                        T130 (XT/AT/EISA)
 - Software version 1.46d or later.
 
 IMPORTANT NOTE: NEC's CDR-74 drives with serial #s B2X04192 and higher
 and CDR-84 drives with serial #s 12Y00001 and higher work correctly with
 single session Photo CD discs.
 
 NEC offers a no-cost repair for drives that do not read Photo CD discs.
 Call the NEC support line for assistance.
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
 Philips/Magnavox (proprietary bus, XT/AT only)
 - CDD 461 (kit)
 - Controller card included with CDD461 drive
 - Software included with CDD461 drive; must be version 1.03 or later
 -------------------------------------------------------------------
 Sony  (proprietary bus, XT/AT only)
 - CDU-535 (internal)          - CDB-X10 (XA Controller)
 - CDU-6205 (external)         - RKB-101 (cable)
 - OPA 1011/3 (CD caddy)
 - Low-level device driver included with CDB-X10 controller
 - MSCDEX (software version 2.20 or later)
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
 Sony  (proprietary bus, XT/AT only)
 - CDU-7205 (CD ROM library)   -  CDB-X10 (XA controller)
 - Device driver software is included with controller
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
 Sony  (SCSI bus) (choose 1 of the following) - CDU-541 (internal)
 - CDU-6211 (external, private label)
 
 1. - CDSEXT (includes SCSI host adaptor card, caddy
 - CDU-7211 (external, Sony label) cable, driver software, XT/AT only)
 - Software driver included with CDSEXT; must be v2.21a or later   or
 
 2. - Sony OPA 1011/3 caddy
 - Future Domain SCSI controller (one of the following)
 XT/AT: TMC-845, TMC-850M, TMC-860M, TMC-885M, TMC-1650, TMC-1660,
 TMC-1670M, TMC-1680;
 EISA: TMC-1760, TMC-1790
 PS/2: MCS-350, MCS-600, MCS-700
 Future Domain CD ROM device driver software, v2.21a or later; (may be
 included with controller)   or
 
 3.  Trantor controller: T128 (XT/AT only), T130 (XT/AT/EISA)
 Software driver included with Trantor controller; must be v1.46d or
 later   or
 
 4.  Adaptec controller AHA-1542BK (for driver choose A or B)
 A)- ASPI manager software (included with Adapec "kits" such as the
 1542BK) or
 B) Corel SCSI software, v1.01F or later
 
 Single Session CD ROM Drive Subsystems with limited capability for
 reading Photo CD discs
 
 For Macintosh Computers
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 Apple (SCSI bus): 
 - Apple CD SC Plus (external)
 - Apple system cable
 - CDROM 150
 Software is included with CD ROM drive
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 NEC (SCSI bus)
 - CDR-73 (external)
 - Apple system cable
 - CDR-83 (internal)
 - Apple SCSI Terminator
 - CDR-36M (portable, external)
 - CDR-37 (portable, external)
 - CDR-74 (external)
 - CDR-84 (internal)
                            (choose either 1 or 2)
 
 (Important: see Note i)
 
 1. Trantor CD ROM drivers for Macintosh, version 1.36 or later
 
 (Important: see Note ii)
 
 2. NEC CD ROM drivers for Macintosh, version 2.25 or later
 
 Notes:
 
 i. NEC's CDR-74 drives with serial #s B2X04192 and higher and CDR-84
    drives with serial #s 12Y00001 and higher work correctly with single
    session Photo CD discs.  NEC offers a no-cost repair for drives that
    do not read Photo CD discs.  Call the NEC support line for
    assistance.

ii. Trantor distributes the Apple Foreign File Access v1.1 and ISO 9660
    File Access v2.0.1 with v1.36 of their own software.  The Photo CD-
    enabled Apple CD ROM device drivers available with software. The user
    should obtain Foreign File Access v1.1.1 and ISO 9660 File Access
    v2.0.2 from Apple.
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 Sony (SCSI bus)
 - CDU-541 (internal)
 - Apple system cable
 - CDU-6211 (external, private label)
 - Apple SCSI Terminator 
 - CDU-7211 (external, Sony label)
 Trantor CD ROM drivers for Macintosh, version 1.33 or later
 
 Multisession CD ROM Drive Subsystems with full capability for reading
 photo cd discs For IBM PC/AT Computers, IBM PS/2 Computers, and
 Compatible Computers:
 
 Mitsumi (proprietary bus, XT/AT only):
 - CRMC-LU005s (internal)
 Controller and software are included with drive
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 GenStar (proprietary bus, XT/AT only):
 - 5000i (internal)
 Controller and software are included with drive
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 Sony (proprietary bus, XT/AT only):
 - CDU-31A (internal)
 Controller and software are included with drive
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
 Toshiba (SCSI bus kit, XT/AT only)
 - TXM3301BSP40Z0 (internal with PC kit) Controller and
 - TXM3301E1P10Z0 (external with PC kit) software are included with drive
 
 Toshiba (SCSI bus kit, PS/2 only)
 - TXM3301BSP60Z0 (internal with PS/2 kit)
 - TXM3301E1P50Z0 (external with PS/2 kit)
 
 Multisession CD ROM Drive Subsystems with full capability for reading
 Photo CD discs For MACINTOSH Computers:
 
 Apple (SCSI bus)
 - CD ROM 300 (internal , external)
 - Apple System Cable
 - Apple SCSI Terminator
 - Driver software included with the drive
 
 Following is a list of potential vendors for the components listed in
 the preceding tables.  It is not a comprehensive list of sources of
 devices.  Many components, such as IBM-compatible computers and Apple
 computer components, can be purchased at your local computer dealer.
 For information on availability, compatibility, pricing, or product
 specifications, please contact the individual vendors.
 
 CD ROM drives:
 
 CD ROM, Inc. (800) 821-5245 (sales) (303) 231-9373 (tech support)
 Chinon (310) 533-0274
 Genesis Integrated Systems, Inc. (612) 544-4445
 Mitsumi  (408) 970-0700
 NEC (800) 388-8888
 Philips Consumer Electronics (800) 722-6224
 Sony Corporation of America (408) 434-6644
 Texel (800) 886-3935
 Toshiba (714) 455-0407  (714) 583-3129 (upgrade info)
 
 SCSI controllers and device drivers
 
 Future Domain Corp. (714) 253-0400, ext. 0491 (Rene Macare)
 Trantor Systems Ltd. (510) 770-1400
 Adaptec (408) 945-8600
 
 Note:  Eastman Kodak Company does not produce or market CD ROM drives.
 Kodak does not recommend or endorse any product listed or described in
 this guide.  The guide is offered as a courtesy to our customers and is
 for informational purposes only.  Kodak intends to update these
 guidelines on a monthly basis through early 1993.  Please call 1-800-
 242-2424, ext. 53 to provide feedback or to receive an updated version
 of the guide.
 
 Contact the drive manufacturers for more complete information on CD ROM
 drive compatibility.
 
 (C) Eastman Kodak Company,1992  CD ROM Drive Guide (12/92)
 


 ######  CONNECT - NEW TELECOMPUTING MAGAZINE
 ######  Press Release
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 Pegasus Press
 3487 Braeburn Circle
 Ann Arbor, MI 48108
 (313) 973-8825
 
 ANN ARBOR, MI -- For a limited time, Pegasus Press is offering
 dramatically discounted subscription rates on its new magazine, CONNECT.
 Covering the major commercial online services, Internet/Usenet and
 bulletin board system networks, CONNECT focuses on telecommunications
 from a user's perspective.  The first bi-monthly issue of CONNECT will
 be available in March, 1993.
 
 Issue after issue, CONNECT shows you how to get the most from the
 commercial online services you're using -- CompuServe, Delphi, America
 Online, Prodigy, GEnie and BIX. With columnists on staff to cover these
 services in depth, you'll find CONNECT a valuable resource.
 
 CONNECT also shows you what "free" networks like Internet have to offer.
 Every issue of CONNECT contains Internet coverage that helps you find
 your way around the biggest network in the world.
 
 But CONNECT doesn't stop there.  BBS callers also receive a wealth of
 information from each issue.  All varieties of computer platforms are
 covered in the pages of CONNECT, as are the many different types of
 bulletin board software and services found on these computers.  Articles
 spotlighting BBSes in specific cities or similar categories (such as
 medical BBSes or handicapped-related systems) appear regularly.
 
 Finally, each issue contains platform-specific columns highlighting
 programs available online for IBM and Macintosh users.  Of course,
 you'll also find hardware and software reviews in CONNECT.  From high
 speed modems and LAN-based BBS systems to shareware terminal programs,
 we cover it all.
 
 Until February 28th, 1993, a year's subscription to CONNECT will be only
 $12.  On March 1st, 1993, the normal subscription price of $18 per year
 goes into effect.  This offer is available only to US addresses.
 
 For more information, please contact Pegasus Press at 3487 Braeburn
 Circle, Ann Arbor, MI 48108 or phone (313) 973-8825.  For the fastest
 response and a copy of the subscription form, please email us at
 70007,4640. (On CompuServe)
 
 Don't delay. Get CONNECTed today!
 
 

 ###### THE 1993 Z*NET COMPUTER CALENDAR 
 ###### Schedule of Shows, Events and Online Conferences
 ###### ----------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 ### January 6-9, 1993
 MacWorld Expo in San Fransisco California, Sponsored by MacWorld
 Magazine.  Titled San Fransisco '93 at the Moscone Center.  Mitch Hall
 Associates, PO Box 4010, Dedham  MA 02026; (617)361-0817, (617)361-3389
 (fax).
 
 
 ### January 7-10, 1993
 The Winter Consumer Electronics Show comes to Las Vegas, Nevada.  CES is
 an electronic playground, with everything in the way of high tech toys
 for kids and adults.  Game consoles and hand-held entertainment items
 like the Atari Lynx are big here, and Atari will attend with a hotel
 suite showroom.  Contact Atari Corp for more information on seeing their
 display at 408-745-2000.
 
 
 ### January 12-14, 1993
 Networld '93 in Boston, Massachusettes
 
 
 ### January 15-18, 1993
 NAMM is the largest conclave of musicians each year.  Held in Los
 Angeles at the Anaheim Convention Center, the variety of sights at the
 National Association of Music Merchandisers is wilder than at
 Disneyland, just next door.  Atari was the first computer manufacturer
 to ever display at NAMM in 1987, and has become a standard at the shows.
 A trade show for music stores, distributors, and professionals of every
 strata, entertainers are seen everywhere at NAMM.  Contact James Grunke
 at Atari Corp for more information at 408-745-2000.
 
 
 ### January 19-22, 1993
 CD-ROM Development Workshop from Multimedia Publishing to Data Archival.
 UCLA Extension Bldg, Los Angeles CA.  (310)825-3344, (310)206-2815 (fax)
 
 
 ### February 2-4, 1993
 ComNet '93 in Washington, DC.
 
 
 ### March 1993
 CeBIT, the world's largest computer show with 5,000 exhibitors in 20
 halls, is held annually in Hannover, Germany.  Atari traditionally
 struts its newest wares there, usually before it's seen in the USA or
 anywhere else.  In '93, the Atari 040 machines should be premiering, and
 this is the likely venue.  Third party developers also use this show to
 introduce new hardware and software, so expect a wave of news from CeBIT
 every year.  Atari Corp and the IAAD coordinate cross-oceanic contacts
 to promote worldwide marketing of Atari products, and this show is an
 annual touchstone of that effort.  Contact Bill Rehbock at Atari Corp
 for information at 408-745-2000.
 
 
 ### March 13-14, 1993
 The Sacramento Atari Computer Exposition is to be sponsored by the
 Sacramento Atari ST Users Group (SST) at the Towe Ford Museum in
 Sacramento, California.  This show replaces the earlier scheduled, then
 cancelled Northern California Atari Fest for the Bay Area, to have been
 held in December 1992.  A major two day effort, the SAC show is being
 held in the special events area of the Towe Ford Museum, home of the
 worlds most complete antique Ford automobile collection.  As an added
 bonus, admission to the museum is free when you attend the Expo.  The
 museum is located at the intersection of Interstates 5 and 80, just 15
 minutes from the Sacramento Metropolitan Airport.  Contact Nick Langdon
 (Vendor Coordinator) C/O SST, P.O. Box 214892, Sacramento, CA 95821-
 0892, phone 916-723-6425, GEnie: M.WARNER8, ST-Keep BBS (SST) 916-729-
 2968.
 
 
 ### March 16-19, 1993
 Image World - Washington DC at the Sheraton Washington.
 
 
 ### March 20, 1993
 Philadelphia, PA area group PACS is holding their 16th annual Computer
 Festival from 9 AM til 4 PM.  It will be a multi-computer show with
 Atari showings by the PACS Atari SIG's, NEAT, CDACC, and JACS clubs.
 The Fest is to be at the Drexel University Main Building, 32nd and
 Chestnut Streets in Pennsylvania.  Contact for Atari display: Alice P.
 Christie, 207 Pontiac Street, Lester, PA 19029, 215-521-2569, or 215-
 951-1255 for general info.
 
 
 ### March 21-24, 1993
 Interop Spring '93 in Washington DC.
 
 
 ### March 30 - April 1, 1993
 Intermedia 93 at the San Jose Convention Center, San Jose CA.
 
 
 ### May 3-5, 1993
 Digital Video New York/MultiMedia Exposition at the New York Sheraton 
 in New York City.
 
 
 ### August 3-6, 1993
 MacWorld Expo at the Boston World Trade Center, Bayside Exposition
 Center and sponsored by MacWorld Magazine.  This event is titled Boston
 '93.
 
 
 ### September 18-19, 1993
 The Glendale Show returns with the Southern California Atari Computer
 Faire, V.7.0, in suburban Los Angeles, California.  This has been the
 year's largest domestic Atari event, year after year.  Contact John King
 Tarpinian at the user group HACKS at 818-246-7286 for information.
 
 
 ### September 20-22, 1993
 The third MacWorld Expo, titled Canada '93 at the Metro Toronto
 Convention Centre, sponsored by MacWorld Magazine.


 ### September 21-23, 1993
 Unix Expo '93 in New York City, New York.
 
 
 ### October 27-29, 1993
 CDROM Exposition at the World Trade Center, Boston MA.
 
 
 ### November 15-19, 1993
 COMDEX Fall '93. Las Vegas Nevada.
 

 If you have an event you would like to include on the Z*Net Calender,
 please send email via GEnie to Z-NET, CompuServe 75300,1642, or via
 FNET to node 593 or AtariNet node 51:1/13.0
 


 ######  THE UNABASHED ATARIOPHILE
 ######  By Michael R. Burkley
 ######  ---------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 Giving is on my mind tonight.  It's Christmas night and I've both
 received and given many gifts today.  For me Christmas is much more than
 the gifts I give to others or receive from them.  Christmas for me is
 the celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ, my Savior.  That's not why
 many people celebrate Christmas, for them it's just a mid-winter
 festival of good times and giving, not connected with any religious
 belief.  That's OK with me, too (not that it makes much difference what
 I think!).  I just feel that they're missing out on some of the "spice"
 that makes Christmas special.
 
 The reason (other than Christmas) that I writing about giving tonight is
 that I am so often amazed at the giving I see throughout the Atari
 community.  Sure, we are often angry at each other and sometimes bitter,
 but again and again I see us giving to each other.  I downloaded over 30
 files this past week (I could have gotten at least 40+ new uploads, but
 didn't for one reason or another).  Each of those files were
 painstakingly created, debugged, and tested; documentation was written,
 pictures were converted, and names were attached.  Then someone had to
 spend the time uploading those files to an online service or BBS.  A
 volunteer SysOp (in the case of a BBS) maintained a bulletin board that
 allowed me and others to call and download a file.  That's a lot of
 giving.  It's downright encouraging!  THANK YOU!
 
 Here's a selection of those files, given to you:
 
 50PLAY is the Pro-Tracker V2.1a Replay (STE/TT) v.1.2 by Martin
 Griffiths.  Some of its features are: 50KHZ STE stereo output, Full
 Compatibility with ALL NoiseTrackers upto NT2.0 (Amiga), Compatible with
 Protracker 1.0 - 2.1a (Nov '92 Amiga version.), The only player to
 feature all Protracker commands, After lots of requests now does 'CIA
 timing,' which means it is the ONLY player that can play modules using
 the TEMPO command! This player doesn't have a flash graphical front-end,
 nor is it meant to.  The program is written to take as little space as
 possible. (58k memory resident ,or about 18k on disk (even less if
 packed...)  It does not 'pad' the samples to gain extra cpu time like
 most players.  This saves memory and means modules are always replayed
 accurately--the player simply 'emulates' the Amiga Paula soundchip.  C
 source code and docs included.  Color or mono.
 
 AEO_SE2 is the Special Edition #2 of ATARI EXPLORER ONLINE dated Dec.
 20, 1992.  This edition includes:  Falcon030 review and icon pics, The
 Three "R's" - AEO style, Lexicor's new Phoenix!, Merry Lynxmas - What a
 deal!, STraight FAX Distribution Change, DMC Promotion Extended, IAAD
 Membership List, Fair Dinkum Xmas Offer, MORE isn't always better, AEO
 Survey Results, PhotoChrome3 and OXYD, Atari Software Catalog, The
 Continuing Saga of Caveat Emptor by Don Harris, A Statement from Atari
 concerning ABCO Computer Consultants.
 
 ATARIPCS is another amazing .PCS file.  It shows a 3-D Atari logo and
 name carved out of colored marble and sitting on a checkered floor.  I
 warn you right now, for quite some time I will be raving about Photo
 Chrome pictures.  Seeing 19,200 colors on an STe color screen is
 amazing.  The pictures are so life-like, better than I have seen before
 on an ST.  Get PCHROME3!!
 
 CALNDR is a Calendar .ACC and .PRG by Roy E. Dean.  Move up and down
 through the months, years and decades with the touch of a button.  What
 day of the week was it when you were born?  This will tell you.  GFA
 Basic 3.5e .LST file included.
 
 CAMPAIGN by Empire is a demo of a new war game that puts you in control
 of your own force of armoured vehicles in the fields of war.  This
 program allows you to take full command of up to 3000 vehicles on over
 20 historically accurate predefined maps ranging in size from 625 to 10
 million square kilometers. Locations range from the Sahara and Russian
 Steppes to the Battles of the Bulge in the Arfennes and the decisive D
 day landings.  Joystick or keyboard controlled. Excellent graphics and
 Digitized sounds.  Online descriptions and help.  Color only.
 
 CENTGDS2 is a series of Century Schoolbook GDOS fonts in 12,18,24 pts.
 The printer fonts are 300 dpi and screen fonts are 72 dpi.  90 dpi is
 standard for most mono applications, but Calligrapher uses 72 dpi, so
 get this if you have Calligrapher.
 
 CGP220 is a series of three color screen dump utilities for the CGP220
 printer by Rich Weaver.  Each of the programs is aimed to optimize a
 different type of screen dump use. SHAREWARE.  Docs included.
 
 EVADER v.1.1 by Dave Munsie (dated Dec. 1992) is a shoot-em-up game with
 excellent graphics and sound.  Guide your craft by moving the joystick
 in the direction you wish to go.  Pick up new weapons and powerpacks as
 you travel along.  When your shields go the game is over.  The game
 saves High Scores and restores the color palette upon exiting.  Low rez
 color only.  Created using GRA Basic 3.5e and the GP_Graphics Engine.
 Docs included.  Floppy or Hard Drive.  ST/STe compatible.  At least one
 meg RAM required.
 
 EZBASE10 is Easy-Base by Anthony Watson of Mountain Software.  This is a
 general purpose SHAREWARE database with all of the usual database
 functions that can be adapted to many common tasks such as Address
 Lists, Inventory, Checkbooks, etc.  This program features build in math
 routines for re-calculating your grocery lists or checkbook totals.  It
 uses the "FrontEnd" NeXT-like interface with 3-D buttons, etc.. The
 unregistered version of Easy-Base is fully operational including saving
 and printing of data files.   However, there is a limit of 20 records
 for any one data file.  Several sample databases included.  The
 Registered version of Easy-Base is limited only by the free memory in
 your machine.  Color or mono.  Docs included.  ST/STe/TT/Falcon
 compatible.
 
 FIXAGIF is the Fix-A-GIF Utility v.0.50 by Lonny L. Pursell and ENCOM
 (dated Dec. 19, 1992). This utility should fix any GIF file which is
 properly constructed as outlined in the GIF specifications.  It will
 remove extra data from GIF8?a files, convert GIF89a files into GIF87a,
 and split GIF8?a files with multiple images into separate files.  Color
 or mono.  Any ST--TT.
 
 FLEX237 is a GNU port of Flex v.2.3.7 by Vern Paxson and jwahar r.
 bammi.  I have no idea what this does.  Docs included, but they mean
 nothing to me!
 
 FOOTSHOT is "Shooting YourSelf in the Foot" (and sometimes not being
 able to do so) using some of the many programming languages available
 today.  Paul Lefebvre gives this lighthearted look at just what you can
 and cannot do using programming languages available today.  It's fun to
 read whether you haven't learned to program (like me) or are conversant
 in all of the 18 languages mentioned.
 
 GREETCRD is a Calamus SL 2-page .CDK and 1-page doc .CDK.  Use this with
 6.25"x9" fine linen single sheet paper with matching envelopes
 (available at stationery shops) to make wonderful Christmas, Birthday,
 and special occasion cards.  Calamus SL required.  225K uncompressed.
 You have to adapt .CDK to your available fonts.
 
 INVACCTD is Studio Manager v.1.06 by Up All Night Software (dated Dec.
 1992).  This is an ST based Invoice and Accounting package for music
 studio management.  Created by studio musicians to make their task
 easier, this demo of the commercial product is intuitive, easy to learn,
 and quick.  If you have a home or professional recording/midi studio
 this program is for you.  It handles client invoice billing and accounts
 receivables.  This demo is save and load disabled.  Printer drivers for
 various printers including the HP Laserjet are included.  Color or mono.
 Any ST(e).
 
 JAYNESMP is a .SMP sound file for use in GEMSOUND.  It is of Jayne
 Mansfield's siren squeal from her big number in "The Girl Can't Help
 It." For those of you who haven't seen this hilarious movie, Jayne's
 boyfriend wants to make her a rock star, but she can't sing a note!
 Nevertheless "Rock Around The Rockpile Blues" becomes a big hit because
 of her siren squeal on the cue "when I hear the whistle blow!"
 
 KID_GP is a game by Dave Munsie created using GRA Basic 3.5e and his GP_
 Graphics Engine.  His kids love it (I do too!)!  The object of KID_GP is
 to collect all the diamonds found on each screen.  That's all you have
 to do to advance to the next screen (15 in all). In the mean time
 various characters will either try to chase you or just get in your way.
 To make things a little more interesting there is a hammer on each level
 which you can grab and clobber them down to size.  There's also special
 mushrooms that you can collect to either speed you up or make you
 invisible for awhile.  This is another one of those "I'll try it one
 more time!" games.  Joystick controlled.  At least one meg of RAM
 required. Docs included.  Floppy or hard drive.
 
 MAHJONGG by Jens Schulz and Thomas Grube is an _excellent_ color and
 mono version of the classic Indian game Mah Jongg.  This comes in both
 an English and a German version.  I think this is an excellent complete
 and free version of this game.  The graphics are excellent, the options
 to change the background and tile colors are very nice, and overall I
 heartily recommend this game.  The written docs are in German, but there
 is English on-line help.  I only wish it had an option to show you a
 suggested move.  Timed or untimed games available.  ST/STe/TT.
 
 BRSHWRKS is BrushWorks TT a full-featured SHAREWARE painting package for
 the TT' 256 color graphics mode.  This program contains tons of features
 (as read from the Docs).  Tony Barker has made some excellent demos for
 the STe and now since he's gotten a TT he's producing programs for it.
 Since I don't have a TT  I can't tell you from experience what a
 wonderful program this is.  Color only.  Docs included.
 
 PRE_EDIT is the Desk Manager Preset Editor v.1.4 by Charles F. Johnson.
 This version fixes a bug that some people were having when a preset file
 contained six .ACC's (the custom files were not being saved).  This
 version has been compiled with the latest GFA compiler, and should work
 on an ST, STe, or TT.  No docs (see your Desk Manager program).
 
 PRINTALL is PrintAll v.1.0 by Greg Wageman.  This seems to be one
 amazing program!  This utility recognizes, reads and prints the
 following file extensions/formats in color or greyscale on the HP 500C
 Color DeskJet printer, and in greyscale on the HP 500: .GIF .MTV .NEO
 .PC1 .PC2 .PI1 .PI2 .QRT .SPC .SPU  Extensive docs are included.  With
 less than four meg of RAM you will find yourself limited in the size of
 the pictures you can print out.  If you have a HP DeskJet (color or not)
 this program is for you!  Color only.
 
 TFA516 is a beautiful and detailed picture of a view overlooking Trunk
 Bay on St. John, Virgin Islands.  Travel Magazine declared this the most
 beautiful beach in the world.  This PhotoChrome .PCS format picture is
 one of the most beautiful on your STe!
 
 TFA574 is a .PCS picture of the skyline of Dallas, TX as seen when the
 sun is setting.  Gold shimmers as the sunlight reflects off the glass
 buildings.  Another beautiful PhotoChrome picture!
 
 TFA575 is a PhotoChrome .PCS format picture of a sunset over ST. Thomas
 island in the Virgin Islands.  The sun glows through the remains of an
 afternoon thunderstorm.
 
 TFA576 is an absolutely stunning .PCS picture of Emerald Bay on Lake
 Tahoe.  The clear blue water, touched by wavelets; the tall pines, the
 huge mountains in the distance, all make this look like a window on the
 world.
 
 ZOE is a beautiful .PCS picture of a beautiful young woman named Zoe
 (which means "spiritual life" in Greek).  The view is of her face and
 hair.  Near photographic quality.
 
 THE_RAM is a small .ACC resizable RAM disk by Tom Mack.  It may be
 installed, resized or removed at will from 100K to 3900K.  It also
 installs itself in the first available drive slot so you don't need to
 choose.  Color or mono.  Docs included.  SHAREWARE.
 
 USEFUL is an extension for STOS that reads the palette of the  sprites
 and uses those colors in defining the 16 color palette. Very useful in
 developing games and not having to remember the colors for your sprites.
 No docs.
 
 That's not all of the "gifts" I received this past week, but that's all
 I have time to pass on to you now.  It's time (past time!) to turn on my
 modem and send this off.
 
 All of these files can be found on one or more of the following on-line
 services:  GEnie, Delphi, The CodeHead BBS (213-461-2095), Toad Hall
 (617-567-8642), and The Boston Computer Society's Atari BBS (617-396-
 9730).
 
                                  # # #
           **--DELPHI SIGN-UP--**       **--GENIE SIGN-UP--**
        ============================|============================
        To sign up for  DELPHI call | To sign up for   GENIE call
        (with modem)  800-695-4002. | (with modem)  800-638-8369.
        Upon connection hit  return | Upon connection type HHH 
        once or twice. At Password: | and hit return.  Wait for
        type ZNET and hit . | the U#= prompt and type in
                                    | the following: XTX99436,
                                    | GEnie and hit return.
        ============================|============================
                        **--COMPUSERVE SIGN-UP--**
                            ------------------
        To sign up for CompuServe service call (with phone) (800)
        848-8199. Ask for operator #198.  You will then be sent a
        $15.00 free  membership kit.
        =========================================================
                       **--ATARINET INFORMATION--**
                           --------------------
        If you'd like further  information or  would like to join
        AtariNet-please contact one of the following via AtariNet
        or Fido: Bill Scull Fido 1:363/112 AtariNet 51:1/0,  Dean
        Lodzinski Fido 1:107/633 AtariNet 51:4/0,  Terry May Fido
        1:209/745 AtariNet 51:2/0, Tony Castorino Fido 1:102/1102
        AtariNet 51:3/0,   Don  Liscombe  AtariNet 51:5/0,  Daron
        Brewood Fido 2:255/402 AtariNet 51:6/0. You can also call
        the Z*Net News Service at (908) 968-8148 for more info.
 ========================================================================
 Reprints from the GEnie  ST  Roundtable   are  Copyright (c)1993,  Atari
 Corporation and the GEnie ST RT.  Reprints  from CompuServe's AtariArts,
 AtariPro,  AtariVen,  or Aportfolio Forums  are  Copyright (c)1993, CIS.
 ========================================================================
 Reprints from AtariUser Magazine are Copyright(c)1993, Quill Publishing.
 All AU articles MAY NOT BE REPRINTED without  the  written permission of
 the publisher.  You  can  subscribe  and  read ALL  of  the  informative
 articles  each  and  every  month by contacting Quill at (818) 246-6277.
 For $15.00 you will receive 12 issues.   Send your  payment to AtariUser
 Magazine,  249  North Brand  Boulevard, Suite 332, Glendale, California,
 USA, 91203.   Foreign delivery is $30.00 in US funds.
 ========================================================================
 Atari is a registered trademark of Atari Corporation.   Atari Falcon030, 
 TOS, MultiTOS, NewDesk and BLiTTER, are trademarks of Atari Corporation.
 All  other  trademarks  mentioned in this publication  belong  to  their 
 respective owners.
 ========================================================================
                 **--** Z*NET OFFICIAL INFORMATION **--**
        =========================================================
 Z*Net Atari Online Magazine is a weekly online publication covering the
 Atari and related computer community.  Material published in this issue
 may be reprinted under the following terms only: articles  must  remain
 unedited and  include  the  issue number and author  at the top of each
 article reprinted.  Reprint  permission  is  granted, unless  otherwise
 noted at the beginning of the article, to  registered Atari user groups
 and not for profit  publications.   Opinions  present  herein are those
 of the individual authors and do not reflect those of the staff.   This
 publication is not affiliated with the Atari Corporation.  Z*Net, Z*Net
 News Service, Z*Net International,  Rovac, Z*Net Atari Online and Z*Net
 Publishing  are  copyright (c)1993, Syndicate Publishing,  PO Box 0059,
 Middlesex, NJ 08846-0059, Voice: (908) 968-2024,   BBS: (908) 968-8148,
 (510) 373-6792.
 ===~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~==
                       Z*Net Atari Online Magazine
           Copyright (C)1993, Syndicate Publishing - Ron Kovacs
 ===~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~==






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